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How To Build People Up, Not Destroy Them While Teaching Faith

Dawah strategy for these troubling times based on the superiority of asserting Allah’s perfection (saying: Alḥamdulillāh) to glorifying Him above imperfection (saying: SubḥānAllāh)

In the name of Allah, the Most Merciful, the Grantor of Mercy. All praise be to Allah, Lord of the worlds.

A Golden Principle

When the Prophet ﷺ entered Mecca victorious, after 20 years of abuse and rejection by the Meccans, he recited the following blessed verses as he removed the idols from around the Ka‘ba, “And say truth has arrived, and falsehood has perished. Indeed, falsehood is bound to perish.” {17: 81} And from that moment onward, people flocked from every direction to embrace Islam in waves. Of course, a person may wonder: if falsehood is “bound” to perish, then why did it remain for so long? It is because truth had not yet arrived, at least not in equal force. Once the truth of Islam became manifest, allotting it an equal playing field with falsehood, there was no contest. Badiuzzamān Nursi (d. 1960), the great Turkish reformer and author of Rasāil-i-Nur (a 5,000 page commentary on the Quran), predicated his awe-inspiring contributions towards restoring Islam in modern Turkey on this golden principle; Muslims are more in need of building what is absent than demolishing what is present.

This is the Quranic formula for returning the ummah to health; focus on developing the good, more than destroying the evil. Similarly, when Allah listed for us which specific elements make this ummah so great, He said, “You are the best community ever raised for humanity – you promote good, forbid evil, and believe in Allah.” {3: 110} It should beg our consideration how the Quranic sequence always places promoting good before combating evil, perhaps hinting again that just as they must work in tandem, one should be a greater priority than the other. Our call to Allah – to be Quranic – must primarily cultivate good in people and society, and secondarily demolish the evils that plague them. If these proportions are not observed in our efforts, we will continue to struggle at transforming people’s hearts and minds the way the Quran once did, and the fruits of our labor will continue not resembling those of our Prophet (ﷺ). If this ratio is observed, perhaps we will soon realize – with many people, at least – that the presence of evil was merely a symptom of their problem, while the absence of good was its root cause.

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Online and in-person, we often find ourselves hurriedly responding to falsehood in uncalculated ways, squandering true opportunities for incremental positive change by the lure of a presumed quick-fix. Too often do we overlook the prophetic “haste is from Shayṭān” rule, lock ourselves into a cycle of reactionary rhetoric, and allow our protective passion for Islam skew our strategy. In management, experts commonly stress the importance of avoiding the ‘firefighting’ approach, where you are always consumed by the emergency at hand. It is a horrible approach, not only because it stunts progress, but more importantly because its endless nature renders it unsustainable and will eventually fail. Similarly, they say in sports that the best defense is a good offense because a boxer blocking in the corner will inevitably find a punch landing past his defenses. Likewise, the maxim in medicine has always been that prevention is better than any cure, because even effective treatment may leave behind irreparable damage.

The Awe of God

Our Prophet ﷺ brought the world a Quran that invested the bulk of its narrative in establishing God’s oneness, not in delegitimizing polytheism (though it certainly does). This Quran also nurtured in its reader’s spirit the magnificence of God, far more than it illustrated the futility of idol-worship, all because deepening your understanding of who Allah is will always outperform identifying who Allah is not, and because the second will naturally happen once the first has been secured. Similarly, Muslim theologians would traditionally highlight how consistently the Quran tends to assert the perfection of God in detail while negating imperfection from God in brevity, for obvious wisdom. Among this wisdom is that lingering on qualities wrongly attributed to God, even for the purpose of refuting them, can actually confer a degree of validity to them – for only if they were imaginable would they need to be disproven at such lengths. If while lauding a king or emperor, you began saying amidst your flattery, “Your highness, you are not a lowlife, nor a heathen, nor an idiot, nor a sewage worker, nor sexually impotent, nor are you repulsively ugly…” you may find yourself dismissed from the royal court for an extended tour of the dungeons below. ‘Umar (may Allah be pleased with him) once flogged a poet for slander because he would say in his poetry, “And my two parents are not fornicators”. Though his words may seem to be defending his parents’ honor, volunteering them prematurely insinuates the possibility of this being imaginable about his parents, and hence required addressing. This would be identical to a child out-of-nowhere swearing he did not eat the chocolate in the cupboard, before anyone ever accused him, drawing by that great suspicion around himself.

Returning to the discussion on God, the Prophet Muhammad ﷺ informed us that the “best of duā’” is asserting Allah’s perfection (saying: Alḥamdulillāh), deeming it superior to glorifying Him above imperfection (saying: SubḥānAllāh). I personally cannot help contrasting that model with the divinity polemics so prevalent in Muslim forums today, where too much of the discussion is a lifeless, doctrinal, checklist approach geared more towards offering sectarian membership than spiritual vigor.

The Love of Materialism

The Quranic method for rescuing people from the shackles of materialism was by flooding them with reasons to have a superior love for God, His company, and His reward. Consider the profound wisdom in not asking the human being to hate the pleasures of this material world, when Allah created this very human being with a hedonistic (pleasure-seeking) nature, and when he or she has not yet familiarized itself with any other form of fulfillment. Instead, what the Quran does is remind them of God’s perfect nature, His delicate dealings, His countless favors, His unique unparalleled nearness – evoking in people firm resolve to prefer Him and His pleasure over any inferior short-lived thrill. Ibn al-Qayyim raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) says in this regard, “If it proves too difficult for them to abandon sinning, then dedicate yourself to making Allah beloved to them by mentioning His favors, grace, kindness, perfect qualities, and majestic attributes. This is because the hearts were disposed upon loving Him, and so once a heart becomes captivated with loving Him, giving up sins becomes easy for it… The acquainted (with God) calls people to Allah by [devotion] through their material world, making it easy for them to comply. The ascetic, on the other hand, calls them to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) through abandoning their material world, making it hard for them to comply because being weaned off a breast that a person has been nursing from since he first came to his senses is extremely difficult.” [Al-Fawā’id: 1/169]

The Dilemma of Doubts

Solidifying faith in a person’s heart is exponentially more useful than eradicating doubt since the latter will never fully happen. Doubts are many time just blind spots in people’s understanding, and the things that we human beings understand will never surpass the things we do not; “and you not been given of knowledge but little” {17: 85}. It would be a perpetual project to dismantle every last doubt, as our lives are too short and our capacities too limited. This is not a call to blind faith or the illegitimacy of any doubt, but rather a recognition that some doubts can only be untangled by specialists and others may only be knowable to God. Therefore, the pragmatic solution is to verify the points of certainty and be anchored by those convictions as I learn further, so that life does not come to a screeching halt every time a new doubt surfaces in our minds. Our certainty would outweigh our doubt in those cases, and liberate us from the painful anxiety of always needing an immediate answer each time. We must focus on supplying ourselves and others with the concrete reasons for believing in the truth of Islam, as only that will immunize us against being rattled by doubts without end.

Numbness to Immorality

Perhaps many would agree that hardly any vice in our times contends with the hypersexuality that seems inescapable in every last movie, song, and advertisement. How then do we protect our families and communities from eventually finding this shamelessness normalized in their hearts? Certainly, cautioning against every last song and movie will not work, as the endless nature of this bombardment will outlast anyone’s endurance, and even his or her life. The only solution is in immunizing such hearts by cultivating in them the values of modesty, honest shame before God, and fear of His anger, through education and role-modeling. These may indeed be long-term solutions, but they far outperform the manual policing and constant condemnations that continue to fail us. We must trust that only this Quranic approach will deliver the desired results.

To that point, ‘Aisha raḍyAllāhu 'anha (may Allāh be pleased with her) said,

“The first to be revealed was nothing else than sūras from the mufaṣṣal (shorter chapters), which contain mention of Paradise and Hellfire. Then, once the people became inclined to Islam, the lawful and unlawful were revealed. If the first thing to be revealed was ‘do not drink wine’, they would have said, ‘We will never give up wine’. And if ‘do not fornicate’ was revealed [first], they would have said, ‘We will never give up fornication’”. [Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhāri: 4707]

Da‘wah: An Invitation

In the arena of calling non-Muslims to Islam, many sincere da‘wah veterans often express their regrets about spending much of their strongest years – their youth – in fiery argumentation. Their focus on identifying the inconsistencies of false beliefs dwarfed their effort in showcasing the marvelousness of Islam, and only decades later did they realize the futility of the former and the efficacy of the latter. As one prominent international caller said, “When someone has worthless sand in their palm and you attack it, this convinces them of its worth and increases their protectiveness of it. But when you simply present your diamonds, they usually tuck their sand-filled hand behind their back in shame and quietly loosen their fingers.”

In fact, this is precisely what the Prophet ﷺ would often do; when ‘Utba b. Rabi‘ā came offering the Prophet Muhammad ﷺ fortune, women, leadership, physicians, and anything else necessary to end his call – what was the prophetic response? He ﷺ was not thwarted by this array of personal offenses from his call to God, nor was he tempted to immediately disprove – though the Quran sometimes did – these baseless accusations of greed, lust, and insanity. Instead, he simply and respectfully said, “Have you concluded, O Abu al-Walīd? Then hear me out…” and proceeded to recite the opening verses from Surat Fuṣṣilat. ‘Utba did not just fail at the negotiation but was so moved by the Quran that he leapt at the Prophet ﷺ and placed a hand over his mouth, pleading with him in defeat to not recite any further. Considering the fact that we should all be calling to Allah in one capacity or another, we should critically consider if this Prophetic ratio of sharing-revelation versus crafting-refutation is reflected in our technique.

We must anchor the good more than we destabilize the evil

The Prevailing Paradigms

We must also trust this process when encountering the various secular philosophies of our modern era. Unfortunately, it is rare to find a Muslim focused on persuading people of the merits of a God-centric lifestyle, while many can be found fixated on combating atheistic liberalism head-on. Similarly, too few Muslims are dedicated to crafting compelling illustrations of how Islam best actualizes gender justice and social harmony, while many have endless energy solely for deconstructing secular feminism. Of course, we all see what this inverted strategy produces each time it is employed; more defensiveness and less willingness to embrace God’s guidance. Is this the desired result, or a bull’s eye on the wrong target? If we are truly invested in people’s wellbeing and salvation, we must recognize that it is not enough to critique the dominant narrative; we need to offer a better narrative. Colonialism and its foreign ideas, for instance, only invaded our worldviews after the collective Muslim heart and mind became colonizable. It was only after we deteriorated spiritually and intellectually did the political debacle of our civilization take place and the ideological invasions ensued. Recognizing this allows us to administer the proper remedy; reintroducing the reality of Islam and tirelessly reminding others about it, not attacking their current convictions and assuming they know better and are simply stubborn and defiant, or assuming that they will take a ‘leap of faith’ and resign to a directionless void before a superior alternative worth subscribing to is identified. It is noteworthy here to highlight the sad transitioning of the Muslim (and non-Muslim) world from one sociopolitical dogma to another in the past century, further proving that our vulnerability to endless -isms is more our disease than whichever particular ideology we are currently experimenting with.

Our righteous predecessors would prioritize educating the masses about the Sunnah, as teaching it will leave no room in Muslim practice for the infiltration of bid‘ah. But if we are duped into predominantly fighting each newly emerging bid‘ah, the few times we triumph may be followed with yet another bid‘ah replacing it to fill the void. It is also like telling our children “no” all the time, in that without detailing out for people where the “yes” spheres are, they will continue to expend their energy and curiosity in ways that you must object to, which further frustrates them towards rebellion, and the downward vicious spiral continues.

Final Thoughts

This is the way of Allah, and the way of His Messenger ﷺ, and I pray you develop your narrative around it as well.

Just as our testimony of faith contains negation (no God) and affirmation (but Allah), our narrative must never become one that is exclusively deconstructive or reconstructive. It must be a tandem, but in the proportions argued above – whether at a dinner table, on social media, or a podium. We must anchor the good more than we destabilize the evil. We must be credible and conversant in denouncing falsehood, but even more so in promoting truth. We must continue to be disapproving of darkness, but be even better at lighting candles. So much of our preaching falls short in that, and so much of our Islamic work is stifled by our delusions about its reality; a backbreaking feature of our ummah in the past century.

We must continue to be disapproving of darkness, but be even better at lighting candles.

It may be a simple oversight, but more likely the nature of our tense times and our pride for Islam tainted with egotism, which has produced this imbalance in us. The cure is to dig deep with difficult questions that nobody can answer for us; questions on our sincerity, the depth of our spiritually, and our distance from Prophetic compassion at heart.

May Allah help us stop seeing kindness as an endorsement of wrongdoing, and stop seeing sensitivity to people’s respective paces as compromise of our principles. May He accelerate positive change for this blessed ummah on our hands, and forgive us all for hindering that, especially the writer of these words whose actions that do not always match them, but reminding of the ideal will keep us feeling conflicted and working towards it inshā Allāh.

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The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

Graduate of English Literature; Translator for IIPH, AMJA, and Mishkah; Da'wah Director @ Muslims Giving Back; Student @ Mishkah University. More blessed than I know, and more than I deserve.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Sara E Huizenga

    April 26, 2019 at 11:38 PM

    This is so beautiful and true and I read this and comment here as a Christian, but more importantly as a believer in God and a part of all of His humanity. Thank you for the hope – may God and His goodness turn more hearts especially right now towards of most current importance the 1.5 million innocent children in Idlib, Syria whose lives are horrifically endangered by a godless global apathy world that focuses on division and betrays our most precious innocent gifts.

  2. Avatar

    Umm Al-Ameen

    May 2, 2019 at 9:33 PM

    Great article. Jazakumllah khayr.

  3. Avatar

    fouzia

    May 4, 2019 at 5:05 PM

    This is Alhumdulillah….May Allah reward the sincere intention..Ameen.

  4. Avatar

    Nunu

    May 5, 2019 at 8:36 AM

    Hamd allah Hamd Allah Hamd Allah
    Sub7an Allah Sub7an Allah Sub7an Allah

  5. Avatar

    Tahmina Haque

    May 7, 2019 at 1:57 AM

    Excellent article MashaAllah! Jazakumullah khair.

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Aqeedah and Fiqh

Prosperity Islam And The Coronavirus Problem

Hadith: “Hasten to perform good deeds before seven events: Are you waiting for poverty that makes you forgetful? Or wealth that burdens you? Or a debilitating disease or senility? Or an unexpected death or the False Messiah? Or is it evil in the unseen you are waiting for? Or the Hour itself? The Hour will be bitter and terrible.

Islam encompasses all of human experience. We believe in the good and bad from divine decree. The ‘problem of evil’ is not a Muslim dilemma because the abode of this world is a test, and the next life is the abode of recompense. Those who do evil in this world may enjoy comfortable and pleasurable lives. Pious Muslims on the other hand may live in immense suffering and oppression.

One’s state with Allah is not known through worldly position.

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The Quran has lots of mention of suffering in this world and the reward for the pious is constantly in the hereafter. Distance from the Quran distances us from what our Creator told us about living in His world.

Habituation to feel-good religious programs and motivational talks has left us unable to know how to be serious. The Coronavirus pandemic should be all the motivation we need for serious learning and hasten to good deeds.

New-age religion and the prosperity gospel

Modern Islamic discourse intertwines notions of sulook (spiritual wayfaring) with new-age spiritual ideas which make spiritual progression a self-centering endeavor of ‘personal development.’ Missing from this discourse is submission to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He), which entails doing what one is obliged to do- even if there is no apparent personal win. A self-centering religious perspective is antithetical to true religion, and ironically a spiritual pursuit becomes a selfish pursuit.

Within this approach, we see our practice of Islam not in terms of fulfilling obligations or understanding we must develop virtues we lack; rather we approach Islam as consumers and form identities around how we choose to be Muslim. This is visible on marriage apps where Muslims will brand themselves around how often they pray, whether or not they eat halal, and how practicing they are. Once this identity is formed, such Muslims are less likely to experience contrition and ultimately improve. The self is then a commodity on the marriage market.

When it comes to worship, for example, giving charity becomes an ‘act of kindness’ to fill the quota of selfless acts to becoming a better person. In other instances, acts of worship are articulated in worldly language, such as fasting in Ramadan being a weight-loss opportunity. One can make multiple intentions, but health benefits of fasting should not be used to articulate the primary benefit of fasting. In other instances, some opt to not pray, simply because they don’t feel spiritual enough to pray. This prioritizes feelings over servitude, but follows from a ‘self’ focused religious mentality.

Much like the prosperity Gospel, Muslims have fallen into the trap of teaching religion as a means of worldly success. While it is true that the discipline, commitment, and work ethic of religious progression can be used for material success, it is utterly false that religious status is on any parallel with material status.

Too many Sunday schools and conferences have taught generations that being a good Muslim means being the best student, having the best jobs, and then displaying the power of Islam to non-Muslims via worldly success and a character that is most compliant to rules. Not only does this type of religion cater to the prosperous and ignore those suffering, it leaves everyone ill prepared for the realities of life. It comes as a shock to many Muslims then that bad things can happen even when you work hard to live a good life. The prosperity gospel has tainted our religious teachings, and the pandemic of COVID19 is coming as a shock difficult for many to process in religious terms. There will be a crisis when bad things happen to good people if we are not in touch with our scripture and favor a teaching focused on worldly gains.

Why it leads to misunderstanding religion

Tribulations, persecution, and events that are outside of our control do not fit the popular self-help form of religion that is pervasive today. Islam means submission, and while we must avoid fatalism, we cannot delude ourselves into idolatry of the self. An Islam that focuses on our individual life journey and finding ourselves has no room for the ‘bad stuff.’ This type of religion favors well-to-do Muslims who are used to the illusion of control and the luxuries of self-improvement. Those who believe that if you are good then God will give you good things in this world will have a false belief shattered and understand the world is not the abode of recompense for the believer.

Islam means submission, and while we must avoid fatalism, we cannot delude ourselves into idolatry of the self.Click To Tweet

Tribulations may then effect faith because it questions the often subconscious teachings of prosperity gospel versions of Islam that we are in control of our own destiny, if we are good enough we will succeed. If this is the basis of a person’s faith, it can be proven “wrong” by any level of tribulation. Having one’s ‘faith’ disproven is terrifying but it should make us ask the question: “Does this mean that Islam is not true, or does this mean that my understanding and my way of living Islam are not true?”

My advice is do not avoid struggle or pain by ignoring it or practicing “patience” just thinking that you are a strong Muslim because you can conquer this pain without complaint. Running from pain and not feeling pain will catch up to us later. Learn from it. Sometimes when we are challenged, we falter. We ask why, we question, we complain, and we struggle. We don’t understand because it doesn’t fit our understanding of Islam. We need a new understanding and that understanding will only come by living through the pain and not being afraid of the questions or the emptiness.

Our faith needs to be able to encompass reality in its good and bad, not shelter us from reality because, ultimately, only God is Real.

Unlearn false teachings

Prosperity religion makes it much easier to blame the person who is suffering and for the one suffering to blame himself. As believers we take the means for a good life in this world and the next, but recognize that acceptance of good actions is only something Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) knows, and that life is unpredictable.

Favor from God is not reflected through prosperity. It is a form of idolatry to believe that you can control God or get what you want from God, and this belief cannot even stand up to a distanced tragedy.

Responding appropriately requires good habits.

Tribulations are supposed to push us towards God and remind us to take life very seriously. Even with widespread calamity and suffering, many of us still have a very self-centered way of understanding events and do not hasten to good actions.

For example, reaching old age is supposed to be an opportunity to repent, spend more time in prayer, and to expatiate for shortcomings. Old age itself is a reminder that one will soon return to his Lord.

However, we see many of today’s elders not knowing how to grow old and prepare for death. Most continue in habits such as watching television or even pick up new habits and stay glued to smart phones. This is unfortunate but natural progression to a life void of an Islamic education and edification.

Similarly we are seeing that Muslims do not know what to do in the midst of a global crisis. Even the elderly are spending hours reading and forwarding articles related to Covid-19 on different WhatsApp groups. This raises the question of what more is needed to wake us up. This problem is natural progression of a shallow Islamic culture that caters to affluence, prosperity, and feel-good messaging. Previous generations had practices such as doing readings of the Quran, As-Shifa of Qadi Iyad, Sahih al-Bukhari, or the Burda when afflicted with tribulations.

If we are playing video games, watching movies, or engaging in idle activities there is something very wrong with our state. We need to build good habits and be persistent regardless of how spiritual those habits feel, because as we are seeing, sudden tribulations will not just bestow upon us the ability to repent and worship. The point of being regimented in prayer and invocations is that these practices themselves draw one closer to God, and persisting when one does not feel spiritual as well as when one does is itself a milestone in religious progression.

While its scale is something we haven’t seen in our lifetime, it’s important to recognize the coronavirus pandemic as a tribulation.  The response to tribulation should be worship and repentance, and a reminder that ‘self-improvement’ should not be a path to becoming more likable or confident only, but to adorn our hearts with praiseworthy qualities and rid them of blameworthy qualities. Death can take any of us at any moment without notice, and we will be resurrected on a day where only a sound heart benefits.

Our religious education and practice should be a preparation for our afterlife first and foremost. Modeling our religious teachings in a worldly lens has left many of us unable to deal with tribulations to the point where we just feel anxiety from the possibility of suffering. This anxiety is causing people to seek therapy. It is praiseworthy for those who need to seek therapy, and noble of therapists to give the service, but my point is the need itself serves as a poignant gauge for how much our discourse has failed generations.

Benefit from Solitude

We should use solitude to our benefit, reflect more, and ponder the meanings of the Quran.  Completing courses on Seerah, Shamail, Arabic, or Fiqh would also be good uses of time. What should be left out however are motivational talks or short lectures that were given in communal events. In such gatherings, meeting in a wholesome environment is often the goal, and talks are compliments to the overall atmosphere. When that atmosphere is removed, it would be wise to use that normally allotted time for more beneficial actions. Instead of listening to webinars, which are not generally building an actual knowledge base that the previously mentioned courses would, nor is it a major act of worship like reading and reflecting upon the Quran. In other words, our inspirational talks should lead us to action, and studying is one of the highest devotional acts.

The pandemic should serve as sufficient inspiration and we need to learn how to be serious. I urge Muslims to ignore motivational and feel-good lectures that are now feel-good webinars, and focus on studying and worshipping. We should really ask if we just lack the capacity to move beyond motivational lectures if we still need motivation in the midst of a global pandemic.  The fact that after years of programming the destination is not the Quran for ‘processing events’ or studying texts for learning is symptomatic of a consciously personality oriented structure.

Muslims struggling to process a pandemic (opposed to coping with associated tragedies, such as loved ones dying or suffering) show the lack of edification feel good talks can produce.

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Coronavirus

A Doctor And A COVID19 Patient: “I will tell Allah about you.”

Guests

By Dr Farah Farzana

I get bleeped at around 2.30am to review a patient. A Pakistani gentleman admitted with Covid19.

The lovely nurse on duty says, “He is on maximum amount of oxygen on the ward, but keeps on removing his oxygen mask and nasal cannula, very confused and is not listening to anyone.”

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I arrive as soon as I can to the ward. I stare at him through the glass doors of the closed bay, while putting on my inadequate PPE.

He looks like he is drowning, he is gasping for air, flushed and eyes bulging like someone is strangling him.

I immediately introduce myself, hold his hands and he squeezes my hand pulls it close to his chest. Starts to speak in Urdu and says he doesn’t know what is going on, he cannot understand anyone and he is so scared.

I give him my Salam and start speaking to him in Urdu. His eyes fill up with tears and hope.

I explain to him he really needs to have his oxygen mask on as we are trying to make him feel better. He tells me he is suffocating with the mask and he doesn’t like the noise. I grab his arm help him sit up in his bed.

We exercise synchronising his breathing and I put the mask and nasal cannula back on.

He asks me Doctor, am I going to die? I cannot hear the voices anymore, they don’t come to visit, everything is quiet and silent, like Allah is waiting to take me to Him. I am lost for words and tell him we are doing all we can to make him feel and get better. He tells me he has been speaking to Allah, he doesn’t care for himself just his family. I know he is scared and feels so alone. I tell him I’m here with him and am not leaving yet. I monitor his saturations and surely they come straight back up. I tell him I am going to give him medications for his temperatures and fluid in his lungs.

He agrees to take them.

He asks me why I didn’t come to see him until now, because I am his own. He says when he speaks to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) he will tell Him about me and that I am a good person and I cared for him.

I get a little choked up.

I can’t gather my thoughts before my bleep goes off again. I have to leave now though I tell him I have lots of patients who need my help. He begs me not to leave, but understands after a while and lets me go.I take off my inadequate surgical mask (PPE) before I leave the bay I look back at him to smile and he smiles back. We both wave goodbye. I can see tears rolling down his cheeks.

I don’t know how he will do, how he is now but I cannot stop thinking about him. I always assume positive outcome if I don’t get called back during the night to see the patient again. Plus it was such a busy night I had no time to stop to reflect, and I continued with a smile.

I speak fluent Bangla and my Urdu isn’t very good. But that night Urdu flawed so effortlessly out of my mouth without any hesitation and I was able to say exactly what I needed to him *SubhanAllah*.

My heart breaks for the minority patients, with language barriers. They are fighting this battle more alone and scared than ever.
Normally, they would rely on family members to translate for them, but given the current situation they must feel helpless.

It’s not just the suffering it’s the suffering alone that pulls on my heartstrings.

‘Indeed, to Allah we belong and to Him we shall return’
Quran 2:156

When all this is over, please remember to appreciate the little things.

  • Appreciate your freedom.
  • Appreciate all the hugs and love.
  • Appreciate your health and your health service.
  • Appreciate your families and loved ones.
  • And just be grateful to be ALIVE.
  • Stay at home. Save lives.
    #stayhome #nhs #gratitude

Courtesy: Facebook post

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featured

I Once Spent Ramadan Semi-Quarantined, Here’s How It Went

Even though it was over 10 years ago, the memory of that Ramadan is seared into my mind.

I’d just taken my first consulting job – the kind in the movies. Hop on a plane every Monday morning and come home late every Thursday night. Except, unlike in the movies, I wasn’t off to big cities every week – I went to Louisville, Kentucky. Every week.

And because I was the junior member on the team, I didn’t get the same perks as everyone else – like a rental car. I was stuck in a hotel walking distance from our client in downtown, limited to eat at whatever restaurants were within nearby like TGI Friday’s or Panera. This was a pre-Lyft and Uber world.

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A couple of months into this routine and it was time for Ramadan. It was going to be weird, and no matter how much I prepared myself mentally, I wasn’t ready for it — Iftar alone in a hotel room. Maghrib and Isha also alone in a hotel room. Suhur was whatever I could save from dinner to eat in the morning that didn’t require refrigeration.

Most people think that with the isolation and extra time you would pass the time praying extra and reading tons of Quran. I wish that was the case. The isolation, lack of masjid, and lack of community put me into a deep funk that was hard to shake.

Flying home on the weekends would give me an energizing boost. I was able to see friends, go to the masjid, see my family. Then all of a sudden back to the other extreme for the majority of the week.

I’ve been thinking a lot about that Ramadan with the prospect of a quarantined Ramadan upon us. I wish I could say that I made the most of the situation, and toughed it out. The truth is, the reason the memory of that particular Ramadan is so vivid in my mind is because of how sad it was. It was the only time I remember not getting a huge iman boost while fasting.

We’re now facing the prospect of a “socially distanced” Ramadan. We most likely won’t experience hearing the recitation of the verses of fasting from Surah Baqarah in the days leading up to Ramadan. We’re going to miss out on seeing extended family or having iftars with our friends. Heck, some of us might even start feeling nostalgia for those Ramadan fundraisers.

All of this is on top of the general stress and anxiety of the COVID-19 crisis.

Ramadan traditionally offers us a spiritual reprieve from the rigors and hustle of our day to day lives. That may not be easy as many are facing the uncertainty of loss of income, business, or even loved ones.

So this isn’t going to be one of those Quran-time or “How to have an amazing Ramadan in quarantine!” posts. Instead, I’m going to offer some advice that might rub a few folks the wrong way.

Make this the Ramadan of good enough

How you define good enough is relative. Aim to make Ramadan better than your average day.

Stick to the basics and have your obligatory act of worship on lockdown.

Pray at least a little bit extra over what you normally do during a day. For some, that means having full-blown Taraweeh at home, especially if someone in the house is a hafiz. For others, it will mean 2 or 4 rakat extra over your normal routine.

Fill your free time with Quran and dua. Do whatever you can. I try to finish one recitation of the Quran every Ramadan, but my Ramadan in semi-quarantine was the hardest to do it in. Make sure your Quran in Ramadan is better during the month than on a normal day, but don’t set hard goals that will stress you out. We’re under enormous stress being in a crisis situation as it is. If you need a way to jump-start your relationship with the Quran, I wrote an article on 3 steps to reconnect with the Qur’an after a year of disconnect.

Your dua list during this Ramadan should follow you everywhere you go. Write it down on an index card and fold it around your phone. Take it out whenever you get a chance and pour your heart out to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He). Share your stresses, anxieties, worries, fears, and hopes with Him.

He is the Most-Merciful and Ramadan is a month of mercy. Approach the month with that in mind, and do your best.

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The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

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