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Sunday Open Thread | Quranic Reflections | 12.12.2010

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“I would like to introduce Br. Nihal Khan who is a fairly new writer for MuslimMatters. He is a friend whom I have known for a very long time and is a brother who has an amazing future ahead, inshaAllah.  He memorized the Qur’an in New York and is currently in the DREAM Arabic intensive program with Ustadh Nouman Ali Khan and is also pursuing his degree in Business.  He is a fellow member of Young Muslims (YM) and has worked as a youth director in New Jersey. Enough of the biographical data on this brother, he is a very honest, friendly, good role model.  He is dedicated to this deen and working to improve our communities.  We look forward to reading his insights on MuslimMatters. Welcome Nihal!” – Amir (MR)

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Have We Attained Success According to the Qur’an?

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Allah tells us in Surah Yusuf, “

إنه لا يفلح الظالمون.

This was what Yusuf (AS) told the wife of the ‘Aziz after she tried to seduce Him (AS). The word selection in the verse was very eye opening to me.

The word “

افلح/يفلح/إفلاح

” means “attaining success after putting in much hard work and strain.” Allah uses the same word in the first verse of Surah Mu’minoon when he refers to attaining khushoo’ in the prayer, ie. it entails that you need to work extra hard to attain concentration.

Another point to note is that the word

ظلم/يظلم

is usually translated as “oppression.” Though this is correct, the context of this word can be many. It can refer to an unjust ruler (ظالم), someone who is giving another a hard time, etc. But one meaning which we all forget is when we commit sins against ourselves.

If we take this whole section of the ayah into consideration we can derive a perspective from it. It may not matter how active we may be in our Muslim community or how much Qur’an we have memorized IF we still do not treat our parents well, behave well towards others, and/or commit sins in private. All of that hard work which we may have done (إفلاح) will be in vain if we continue to commit sins (ظلم) and not live according to how Allah wants us to live and seek ways to better ourselves.

May Allah guide us all to the straight path.

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The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

Nihal Ahmad Khan is currently a student of Islamic Law and Theology at Nadwatul 'Ulama in Lucknow, India. He was born and raised in New Jersey and holds a bachelor's degree in Psychology and a minor in Business from Montclair State University and a diploma in Arabic from Bayyinah Institute's Dream Program. He began memorizing the Qur’an at Darul Uloom New York and finished at the age of seventeen at the Saut al-Furqan Academy in Teaneck, New Jersey. He went on to lead taraweeh every year since then. Along with his education, Nihal has worked in various capacities in the Muslim community as an assistant Imam, youth director, and a Muslim Chaplain at correctional facilities and social service organizations. Nihal is also an MA candidate in Islamic Studies from the Hartford Seminary in Connecticut.

19 Comments

19 Comments

  1. Sadaf Farooqi

    December 12, 2010 at 12:33 AM

    Unique, interesting perspective. Barak Allahu feek.

  2. Pingback: Sunday Open Thread | Quranic Reflections | 12.12.2010 | allah.eu

  3. Nayma

    December 12, 2010 at 7:10 AM

    JAzak allahu khairan for breaking down the meaning of the words for us.

    Our sisters group have been watching and enjoying Br. Noman Ali Khan’s Arabic class online.

    It so true that we have to keep accounting ourselves for our behavior that only Allah sees. How we talk to our kids and closest family members shows our manners. May Allah help us to do hisab on ourselves before it is done on us.

    • Asmaa

      December 12, 2010 at 10:20 AM

      How do you attend the classes online sister?

  4. Ameera Khan

    December 12, 2010 at 1:07 PM

    JazaakAllah khayr, Br Nihal! This short post carries more meaning in it than many long ones I’ve read. And I didn’t know you were part of the awesome Dream program, Masha’Allah!

  5. Sabour Al-Kandari

    December 12, 2010 at 3:46 PM

    Mash’Allah bro, looking forward to reading your work.

    I love how the pic is titled “weemee.jpg” – lol!

  6. Daughter of Adam (AS)

    December 12, 2010 at 4:27 PM

    Masha’Allah, it’s great to hear from the Dream students! insha’Allah we will all be able to attend it soon!! Until I’m old enough… <3 dua'a for the current students till then!

  7. mystrugglewithin

    December 12, 2010 at 8:58 PM

    Jazakallahu khairun brother Nihal and welcome! :>

    “All of that hard work which we may have done (إفلاح) will be in vain if we continue to commit sins (ظلم)”

    Just to add to it – we must continue to do good because we can’t possibly stop sinning. There are numerous references where we’ve been given hope of expiation of our sins given that we keep up with the good deeds, and seek forgiveness. Insha’Allah.

    • Nihal Khan

      December 15, 2010 at 1:00 PM

      Jazakillahu khair!

      I agree, thanks for the addition!

  8. Hena Zuberi

    December 12, 2010 at 9:42 PM

    JazakAllah khair for the reminder and explanation- May Allah (SWT) put barakah in your studies.

  9. dream fellow

    December 12, 2010 at 10:09 PM

    barak Allah feek Nihal, nice perspective.
    Edit: please be respectful in your comments. thanks.

  10. Ify Okoye

    December 13, 2010 at 1:44 AM

    Salaam alaykum Nihal,

    Welcome to MM, may your time and efforts prove beneficial.

  11. Amad

    December 13, 2010 at 4:51 AM

    welcome Nihal… seems u have been part of mm for a long time :)

  12. Faiez

    December 15, 2010 at 12:48 PM

    I think the same conclusion you reached through the Arabic could’ve been reached by reading the English translation.

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