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Sunday Open Thread 6/20/2010: Can Les Bleus Save France From Civil War?

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The current trend of anti-immigration, anti-religion (read: anti-Muslim) legislation in Europe arguably began with France’s landmark “Law on Secularity and Conspicuous Religious Behaviors and Symbols in Schools” in 2004. Colloquially dubbed the French headscarf ban for its disproportionate effect on young Muslim schoolgirls, this policy foreshadowed a wave of right-wing hysteria over the supposed Islamization of European cities and suburbs.

To this end, threats of a looming “Eurabia” have, particularly over the past couple of years, fueled assimilationist agendas across the continent. France, given its well defined national character and commitment to a strictly secular society, is one of the most austere proponents of this trend. Despite its seemingly hostile climate, however, the future of Islam  in France is hardly a forgone conclusion.

Certainly, there are a lot of reasons to be pessimistic about the prospects for French Muslims. From the niqab ban earlier this year, to the more stringent immigration policies it gave rise to, to the recent allowance of a provocative political poster in Southern France, it seems that French policies are continuing down an Islamophobic road. One prominent public intellectual in France, Eric Zemmour, predicts where this road will lead in his latest book Mélancolie Française. In addition to blaming the sorry state of France on past English provocation and current French political correctness, Zemmour, an Algerian Jew, asserts that France is doomed to civil war between Christians and Muslim “barbarians.” What’s more, he claims that he is only speaking what the (truly) French people are thinking.

Yet, there are also signs that Zemmour and his ilk underestimate both the adaptability of French Muslims and the tolerance of French society. Last week, for example, a planned “Pork and Booze” street party in a predominantly Muslim neighborhood was banned by French police. Even more heartening is the start of a new “mega-mosque” in Marseilles, a city home to a quarter million Muslims. In the near-term, however, the best opportunity for a shift in national sentiment towards Muslims is not likely to arise from a parliamentary office or construction site, but a soccer pitch.

France is a soccer crazed national, and nothing would lift the national spirit more than a World Cup championship. Imagine, then, how the French would feel if a number of the individuals responsible for bringing them such joy were Muslim? Well, as it happens, there are more than a handful of (inshAllah practicing) Muslims starring on the French squad, including Frank Ribery, Nicolas Anelka, and Eric Abidal. Admittedly, France is a bit of longshot to win it all this year, but that seems fitting given Islam’s seemingly underdog position in Europe. Here’s at least one reason, then, to root for (instead of against) the French for the next couple of weeks.

Allez les bleus!

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Youssef is from Brooklyn, New York by way of Alexandria, Egypt. Currently, he is a doctoral student at the University of Southern California studying Political Science and International Relations. A student of Islam, history, and politics, his recent extended stay in Cairo placed him squarely at the nexus of these disciplines. Follow him on Twitter (@TheAlexandrian) as he tries to make sense of all that's happening in Tahrir and beyond.

24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. Avatar

    ibn Ahmed

    June 20, 2010 at 5:33 AM

    Asalaamualaikum

    Either you wrote this a while ago or you don’t follow football much but France have hardly any chance of qualifying from their group never mind winning the World cup. As for Nicolas Anelka he has been sent home early for having an argument with the manager. Underdog is and understatement.

    On more important matters, what are peoples views on Dr Zakir Naik being refused entry to the UK? For me this is something terribly worrying because if someone like him can be banned for being an “extremist” then what hope is there for other imams, scholars and preachers? The evidence they use against him is laughable. Is this the beginning of a crack down on Muslim activity from the new coalition government? May Allah help us all.

  2. Avatar

    Hassan

    June 20, 2010 at 7:02 AM

    France team sucks, so lets not wait for them to solve the crisis.

    I was shocked to see Anelka in team, as he is always been ignored because of his anger and attitude. He was substituted in half time last match, and he told coach to go ______ yourself, and he was sent home.

    Frank Bilal Ribery, may Allah forgive him, and guide him, and increase in his eman, was recently part in running of under-age prostitution ring.

    Holland has 2-3 allegedly muslim players. Van Persie is rumored to be muslims, but muslims, can not confirm it. Then there is for sure a muslim Khalid Boulahrouz in it and also Ibrahim Afellay.

    And holland has chance to win, so better support them,

    • Avatar

      elham

      June 20, 2010 at 10:58 AM

      Sheesh,did you have to tell us that about Ribery?, Allah yahdeek.

      France and Scandinavia are not easy places to practice the deen so I am not going to expect great religiosity from people born in such environments.

      This year I am with Algeria(desperate) or with an African team,time to see a different team win:) Don’t mind New Zealand winning either (fat chance, but still).

      • Avatar

        Hassan

        June 20, 2010 at 2:34 PM

        So you would not look stupid to non-muslims in doing dawah by telling look Ribery is muslim as well, and they would say Ribery the one involved in under-age prostitution ring.

        Ameen to your dua.

        • Avatar

          elham

          June 20, 2010 at 7:39 PM

          What da’wah is pointing at people? Nope akhi, I start with something called Tawheed, not a ”look Obama has a Muslim auntie!”. Where do you get these ideas from. I only meant the mentioning of his sins like that.

          • Avatar

            Hassan

            June 20, 2010 at 7:56 PM

            i would hope people think that other people are thinking as well. When I was writing, I thought is it considered exposing of sins of muslim brother? Answer was no, because its already in media, and the way author of article wrote it, I made a tough call to repeat what is commonly known about his sins, so that we do not go blind in supporting a team just based on that and plus you may not start dawah like that, but some people may.

            In the end I made a judgement, and it was well intended, and unfortunately I have to write a paragaraph to explain my thought process.

          • Avatar

            amad

            June 21, 2010 at 12:12 AM

            But Hassan mentioning someone’s sins without any real reason (for instance, if we were talking about him as a role-model, that might be significant), is not appropriate.

            The difference between him and tons of born-Muslims is that he got caught. He didn’t justify it. It’s between him and Allah now.

            And as for dawah, maybe its problematic, but becoming a Muslim doesn’t mean you stop being a human being.

          • Avatar

            Abu Noor Al-Irlandee

            June 21, 2010 at 9:30 AM

            Amad,

            The article wasn’t suggesting the players as role models? It talked about how great it would be for France to see Muslims contributing to bringing the World Cup to the country and how the players were examples (among others) of how one could be both French and Muslim.

            Also, the allegations against Ribery involve more than just private sins, they involve activity which is criminal even in France (where prostitution itself is legal) and the exploitation of minors.

            I am not saying it is clear cut whether it should have been mentioned or not, but I think people are being very unfair to Hassan.

            May Allaah (swt) forgive all of us for our sins and make us merciful amongst each other.

            Allaah knows best.

          • Avatar

            Hassan

            June 21, 2010 at 10:18 AM

            Yes people are being unfair to me, not because they disagree, and they would not have mentioned it themselves, but to think that I have not given this thought when writing this.

          • Amad

            Amad

            June 21, 2010 at 11:33 AM

            yes, let’s be merciful.
            to sinners as well.

            the guy did a remarkable thing to become a muslim (for himself) in a country that despises muslims. he is STILL a muslim.

            unfair? this is blogging, and we can disagree… its nothing personal against Hassan and he knows that from me.

    • Avatar

      Hassan

      June 21, 2010 at 12:16 PM

      I guess people dont read comments very well.

      Frank Bilal Ribery, may Allah forgive him, and guide him, and increase in his eman, was recently part in running of under-age prostitution ring.

      I think there is nothing better I can write than that. I am not being harsh at all.

      • Avatar

        elham

        June 21, 2010 at 7:28 PM

        Don’t worry brother I read that and I never thought you were not well intentioned , Ameen to yours and Abu Noor’s duas.

  3. Amad

    Amad

    June 20, 2010 at 7:33 AM

    • Avatar

      elham

      June 20, 2010 at 11:01 AM

      Mash’ Allah,thats what I mean. We should encourage them in doing good. They need our support not just as fans but more importantly,their brothers and sisters in Islam.

  4. Avatar

    Youssef Chouhoud

    June 20, 2010 at 10:37 AM

    Heh, yeah, I guess I put a bit of an optimistic spin on the situation, but stranger things have happened. In last year’s confederations cup, for instance, USA needed to beat Egypt 3-0 in order to advance instead of them…and…well…every Egyptian knows what happened :/

    In any case tho, I just think that it’s remarkable that there are so many Muslims representing this country that, as observed, is a bit hostile to Muslims.

    The saga of Dr. Naik is disheartening to say the least. It seems that there are always some trumped up charges brought up against any renowned daee/scholar entering a Western country these days. Governments should really be more mindful of the psychological effect this has on there Muslim population.

  5. Avatar

    Mezba

    June 20, 2010 at 5:38 PM

    The Toronto Star take on Dr Zakir Naik. He is visiting Toronto next month.

    http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/825838–islamic-televangelist-booked-for-toronto

  6. Avatar

    F

    June 20, 2010 at 7:32 PM

    Tarek Fatah again……..I suppose the media goes to him because he serves their purpose.

  7. Avatar

    sebkha

    June 20, 2010 at 11:00 PM

    Did Zidane winning the ’98 World Cup for France prevent the 2005 riots? Nope. Neither did it prevent the results from a 2007 study in France that showed that if you’re an Arab or sub-Saharan African in France, you have a less than 11% chance of being treated equally by employers. The utter majority of beurs in France are Muslim, and a sizable percentage of sub-Saharan Africans living there are Muslim as well. Nor has it prevented Muslim World War 2 veterans’ graves in France from being vandalized over and over and over, and it didn’t get the French government to finally stop ripping off Arab and sub-Saharan African veterans of that same war by denying them their military pensions.

    I am, for the most part, a pretty optimistic sort of lady. But in this case, I think the author just asks too much of me, in trying to drum up optimism on this particular topic. Sorry. Even with a home-grown convert fellow such as Ribery…meh. Though his past indiscretions might endear him to a certain percentage of French, adultery being almost as much of a French cliche as stinky cheese and baguette. Though for our purposes, his indiscretions really, really don’t help a darn thing.

  8. Avatar

    Dreamlife

    June 21, 2010 at 2:00 AM

    I always liked Anelka – from the time he was at Arsenal. It’s sad, what’s happening to the national team.

    In 2006, I supported France because i’d found out about Zidane – so it did give a kind of closeness.

    Anyway, yes, there are many Muslim players in top European club and national teams – but what counts, to me, is how they uphold their deen.

    Obviously the sports industry is not the ideal place for a Muslim – given the obscene amounts of money spent on a mere pastime; and the alcohol and bad behaviour largely associated with the game in some places – like England (pub culture – but that’s just ENglish culture, i think).

    But how you maintain your deen in that environment – is what’s most admirable. I think many players still fast in Ramadaan while playing.

    In South Africa, we have a cricket player called Hashim Amla – and he’s a role model for our Muslim youth because of his strong Muslim identity – what he displays outwardly. He doesn’t just try to blend in and go with the flow.

    I would love for the Muslim footballers in Europe to be similarly strong in their outward profession of their deen – as a means of da’wah to those in that environment.

  9. Avatar

    Manas Shaikh

    June 21, 2010 at 8:46 AM

    The flotilla massacre was no accident.

    It is designed to poison relation between US and a longtime ally Turkey. The US’s handling of the issue has to be very nuanced because I sense there are some vile interests at play here.

    Israel has been a strategic asset for the US since the late sixties when the Arab countries turned to USSR for friendship, and has benefited greatly from the relationship. US relied heavily on Israel to counter Syrian and Egyptian governments in the region, and provided Israel with aid, intelligence, expertise, equipment and political support. The cold war is over, and what Israel is worried that US may not care about it as much.

    The Israelis came in with a belligerent attitude onto the Turkish ship Mavi Marmara, killing nine people from close range. Incidents that was certain to cause uproar in Turkey, and sour Turkish-Israeli relationship. This appears to be a deliberate goal of the campaign.

    But Israel had a friend in Turkey in the region, even until 2008.

    Which begs the question: why? Why alienate their only ally in the region?

    It appears that now they see Turkey as a regional challenge. Turkey has been a staunch ally of the US for longer than 60 years, recently has risen economically, and now the size of Turkish economy is three times that of Israel. They used to be comparable not so long ago.

    Israel is afraid to have a country that is an ally of the US in it’s neighborhood that is much more important politically and economically than itself. It fears that Israel will become insignificant to the US (compared to Turkey) in the region. It therefore wants to sabotage the relationship between the US and Turkey by forcing US to choose between the two- so as to remain the only ally US has in the region. They want US to depend on Israel in that region and only on Israel. It will open US to blackmail.

    Which is very clever, if not found out.

  10. Avatar

    ummousama

    June 21, 2010 at 8:18 PM

    Assalamu alaikum,

    My question to the writer: Have you ever lived in France? Are you reading or listening to French media? Do you really think any country will thank and change their behaviour and their racism because of sport? Have you read what happened to Muhammad Ali, back in 1968, when he won the gold in the Olympics? He went back home to California and was banned from entering a restaurant for whites. So the country loved him and respected him because he won a gold medal for the US but it doesn’t mean they changed their behaviour.

    And now here is a question on tawheed and wala and baraa: Is it right for a Muslim to represent (in sport) a country that openly fights Islam or to even represent any kafir country?

    • Avatar

      Abu Noor Al-Irlandee

      June 22, 2010 at 12:12 PM

      It is right to say that having an athlete do well does not change everything over night. Many sports in the United States have long been dominated by Blackamericans, and this doesn’t necessarily make life better for the masses of Blackamericans…it has positive and negative effects.

      I used to really love sports growing up as a non-Muslim, but if you spend time around athletes you learn that especially with regard to famous ones they are in general not people whose character is especially admirable, certainly they are not people in general who should be held out as role models, especially for Muslim youth. Of course, this makes the exceptions even more special.

      Muhammad Ali actually did over the long course of his career have positive effects for da’wah…that is undeniable. I’m sure he himself would admit that he did not always act in the best of ways, so it is complicated.

      Allaah knows best.

  11. Avatar

    abu Abdullah

    June 23, 2010 at 12:21 AM

    And now they (the lobby) are coming for the internet…http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hl7p4enV4Uw

    few politicians were willing to take the risk to act against such a popular medium. It is unsurprising therefore that it took someone as shameless as Joe Lieberman, the man who has only ever saluted one flag–the Israeli flag–to propose a bill that gives the US president authority to ‘kill’ the internet. His model? Why, the great people’s republic of China course.

  12. Avatar

    pop goes the weezle

    June 23, 2010 at 2:06 AM

    ppl should really stop back bitting.. relax, its just an article.. this place is becoming more ‘backbitting matters’ and muslimmatters.. its just an article.. read, understand it or think abt it, or just delete it off your memory and then move on.. my god whats with you ppl!

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#Life

7 Powerful Techniques For Keeping New Year’s Resolutions

Studies show the most common New Year’s resolutions revolve around finances and health.  Unfortunately, they also show only a relatively small number will keep most or all of them. The rest will mostly fail within the first few weeks. Here are 7 powerful techniques to make sure you’re not one of them.

New Year's Resolutions
Who uses sticky notes on a cork board #stockimagefail
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It’s the end of the year, and I’m pretty sure I know what you’re thinking – after wondering if New Year’s is halal to celebrate, you probably want to lose some weight, make more money, talk to family more, or be a better Muslim in some way.  The New Year for many of us is a moment to turn a fresh page and re-imagine a better self. We make resolutions and hope despite the statistics we’ll be the outliers that don’t fail at keeping our New Year’s resolutions.

Studies show the most common New Year’s resolutions revolve around finances and health. Unfortunately, they also show only a relatively small number will keep most or all of them. The rest will mostly fail within the first few weeks.

Given such a high failure rate, let’s talk about how you can be among the few who set and achieve your goals successfully.

1. Be Thankful to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He)

Allah Gives You More if You’re Thankful

You’ve been successful this past year in a number of areas. Think of your worship, career, relationships, personality, education, health (physical, mental, social, and spiritual), and finances. Take a moment to reflect on where you’ve succeeded, no matter how trivial, even if it’s just maintaining the status quo, and be thankful to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) for those successes.

When you’re thankful to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He), He increases you in blessings.  Allah says in the Qur’an:

“And (remember) when your Lord proclaimed, ‘If you give thanks (by accepting faith and worshipping none but Allah), I will give you more (of My blessings); but if you are thankless (i.e. disbelievers), verily, My punishment is indeed severe’” [14:7] 

In recent years, there’s been more discussion on the benefits of practicing gratitude, though oftentimes it’s not clear to whom or what you’re to be grateful towards. We, of course, know that we’re not grateful simply to the great unconscious cosmos, but to our Creator.

Despite this difference, there exist interesting studies on how the practice of gratitude affect us. Some of the benefits include:

  • Better relationships with those thanked
  • Improved physical health
  • Improved psychological health
  • Enhanced empathy and reduced aggression
  • Better sleep
  • Improved self-esteem
  • Improved mental strength

Building on Your Successes

In addition to being thankful to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He), reflect on why you were successful in those areas.  What was it you did day in and day out to succeed? Analyze it carefully and think of how you can either build on top of those present successes, or how you can transport the lessons from those successes to new areas of your life to succeed there as well.

In the book Switch by Dan and Chip Heath, they note that we have a tendency to try to solve big problems with big solutions, but a better technique that has actual real-world success in solving complex problems is to instead focus on bright spots and build on those bright spots instead. You have bright spots in how you’ve worked and operated, so reflect on your successes and try to build on top of them.

2. Pick One Powerful, Impactful Goal

Oftentimes when we want to change, we try to change too many areas.  This can lead to failure quickly because change in one area is not easy, and attempting to do it in multiple areas simultaneously will simply accelerate failure.

Instead, pick one goal – a goal that you are strongly motivated to fulfill, and one that you know if you were to make that goal, it would have a profoundly positive impact on your life as well as on others whom you are responsible to.

In making the case based on scientific studies, James Clear, author of Atomic Habits, writes:

Research has shown that you are 2x to 3x more likely to stick with your habits if you make a specific plan for when, where, and how you will perform the behavior. For example, in one study scientists asked people to fill out this sentence: “During the next week, I will partake in at least 20 minutes of vigorous exercise on [DAY] at [TIME OF DAY] at/in [PLACE].”

Further down, he states:

“However (and this is crucial to understand) follow-up research has discovered implementation intentions only work when you focus on one thing at a time.”

When setting your goal, be sure to set a SMART goal, one that is Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time Bound.  “I want to lose weight” is not a SMART goal.  “I want to achieve 10% bodyfat at 200 lbs in 9 months” is specific (you know the metrics to achieve), measurable (you can check if you hit those metrics), achievable (according to health experts, it can be done, realistic (it’s something you can do), and time-bound (9 months).

3. Repeatedly Make Du’a with Specificity

Once you lock onto your goal, you should ask for success in your goal every day, multiple times a day.  Increasing in your du’a and asking Allah for success not only brings you the help of the Most High in getting to your goal, it also ensures it remains top of mind consistently.

A few of the best ways to increase the chances of a supplication being accepted:

  • Increase the frequency of raising your hands after salah and asking for your intended outcome.
  • Asking while you are in sujood during prayers.
  • Praying and supplicating in the last 3rd of the night during qiyam ul-layl.

When you make your du’a, be specific in what you ask for, and in turn, you will have a specific rather than a vague goal at the forefront of your mind which is important because one of the major causes of failure for resolutions themselves is lacking specificity.

4. Schedule Your Goal for Consistency

The most powerful impact on the accomplishment of any goal isn’t in having the optimal technique to achieve the goal – it is rather how consistent you are in trying to achieve it.  The time and frequency given to achievement regularly establishes habits that move from struggle to lifestyle. As mentioned in the previous section, day, time, and place were all important to getting the goal, habit, or task accomplished.

In order to be consistent, schedule it in your calendar of choice. When you schedule it, make sure you:

  • Pick the time you’re most energetic and likely to do it.
  • Work out with family, friends, and work that that time is blocked out and shouldn’t be interrupted.
  • Show up even if you’re tired and unmotivated – do something tiny, just to make sure you maintain the habit.

A Word on Automation

Much continues to be written about jobs lost to automation, but there are jobs we should love losing to automation, namely, work that we do that can be done freely or very cheaply by a program.  For example, I use Mint to capture all my accounts (bank, credit card, investments, etc) and rather than the old method of gathering receipts and tracking transactions, all of it is captured online and easily accessible from any device.

Let’s say you wanted to give to charity, and you wanted to give a recurring donation of $5 a month to keep MuslimMatters free – all you have to do is set up an automated recurring donation at the link and you’re done.

Likewise, if you’re saving money for a goal, you can easily do so by automating a specific amount of money coming out of your bank account into another account via the online banking tools your bank provides.  You can automate bill payments and other tasks to clear your schedule, achieve your goals, and keep you focused on working the most important items.

5. Focus on Behaviors, Not Outcomes

We’re often told we should set up SMART goals – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timebound.  However, one way to quickly fail a goal is by defining success according to outcomes, which aren’t necessarily in your hand.  For example, you might say as above:

“I want to be at 10% body fat in 9 months at 200 lbs.”

This is a SMART goal, and it’s what you should aim for, but when you assess success, you shouldn’t focus on the result as it’s somewhat outside the scope of your control. What you can do is focus on behaviors that help you achieve that goal, or get close to it, and then reset success around whether you’re completing your behaviors.  As an example:

“I want to complete the P90X workout and diet in 90 days.”

Here, you’re focused on generally accepted notions on behaviors that will get you close to your goal.  Why? Because you control your behaviors, but you can’t really control the outcomes. Reward yourself when you follow through on your behavior goals, and the day-to-day commitments you make.  If you find that compliance is good, and you’re getting closer to your goal, keep at it.

Read the following if you want to really understand the difference in depth.

6. Set Realistic Expectations – Plan to Fail, and Strategize Recovery

After too many failures, most people give up and fall off the wagon.  You will fail – we all do. Think of a time you’ve failed – what should you have done to get back on your goal and complete it?  Now reflect on the upcoming goal – reflect on the obstacles that will come your way and cause you to fail, and how when you do fail, you’ll get right back on it.

Once you fail, ask yourself, was it because of internal motivation, an external circumstance, a relationship where expectations weren’t made clear, poor estimation of effort – be honest, own what you can do better, and set about attempting to circumvent the obstacle and try again.

7. Assess Your Progress at Realistic Intervals

Once you’re tracking behaviors, simply mark down in an app or tracker that you completed the behavior.  Once you see you’re consistent in your behaviors over the long-term, you’ll have the ability to meaingfully review your plan and assess goal progress.

This is important because as you attempt to perform the work necessary to accomplish the goal, you’ll find that your initial assessments for completion could be wrong. Maybe you need more time, maybe you need a different time. Maybe you need a different process for accomplishing your goals. Assess your success at both weekly and monthly intervals, and ask yourself:

  • How often was I able to fulfill accomplish my required behaviors?  How often did I miss?
  • What was the reason for those misses?
  • Can I improve what I’m doing incrementally and change those failures to successes?  Or is the whole thing wrong and not working?

Don’t make changes when motivation dies after a few days.  Don’t make big changes on a weekly basis. Set an appointment on a weekly basis simply to review successes and challenges, making small tweaks while maintaining the overall plan. Set a monthly appointment with yourself to review and decide what you’ll change, if anything, in how you operate.

Be something of a Tiger mom about it – aim for 90% completion of behaviors, or an A grade, when assessing whether you’ve done well or not.  Anything below 90% is a failing grade.

(ok, so Tiger Moms want 100% or more, but let’s assume this is a somewhat forgiving Tiger Mom)

Putting it All Together

Set ‘Em Up

  • First, take a moment to reflect and be thankful to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) for what you’ve achieved, and reflect on what it is you’ve accomplished and what you’ve done in the way you worked and operated that helped you succeed.
  • Next, pick one goal and one goal alone to achieve, and use the SMART goal methodology to be clear about what it is.
  • Once this is done, make du’a with strong specificity on a regular basis during all times, and especially during the times when du’as are most likely to be accepted.

Knock ‘Em Down

  • Schedule your goal into a calendar, making sure you clear the time with any individuals who will be impacted by your changed routines and habits.
  • On a daily basis, focus on completing behaviors, not the outcomes you’re aiming for – the behaviors get you to the outcomes.
  • Plan on failing occasionally, especially a week after motivation disappears, and plan for how you’ll bounce back immediately and recover from it.
  • Finally, on a daily and weekly basis, assess yourself to see if you’re keeping on track with your behaviors and make adjustments to do better. On a monthly basis, assess how much closer you are to your goal, and if you’re making good progress, or if you’re not making good progress, and try to understand why and what adjustments you’ll make.

What goals do you plan to achieve in the coming year?

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MuslimMatters has been a free service to the community since 2007. All it takes is a small gift from a reader like you to keep us going, for just $2 / month.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

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Ten Reasons You Should Support MuslimMatters

Support MuslimMatters for Just $2 a Month

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The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

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Support Our Dawah for Just $2 a Month

MuslimMatters has been a free service to the community since 2007. All it takes is a small gift from a reader like you to keep us going, for just $2 / month.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

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Loving Muslim Marriage Episode #8: Female Orgasm

Support MuslimMatters for Just $2 a Month

MuslimMatters has been a free service to the community since 2007. All it takes is a small gift from a reader like you to keep us going, for just $2 / month.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

Have you ever heard the myth that women only need to orgasm every 3-5 years, if at all? If you heard it packaged as “Islamic” advice, then you’re neither the only one. Cultural myths likes these sometimes make their way into mainstream Muslim culture disguised as wisdom, only to create problems for men, women, and marriages across the board.

Cultural myths about female orgasm - or the lack thereof - make their way into Muslim culture and hurt Muslims and their marriages. Click To Tweet

Support Our Dawah for Just $2 a Month

MuslimMatters has been a free service to the community since 2007. All it takes is a small gift from a reader like you to keep us going, for just $2 / month.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

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