‘Izzah: Following the Path of the People Before Us?

  • Part One: ‘Izzah – Forgotten Concept, Lost Virtue
  • Part Two: Literary Analysis, Islamic Understanding
  • Part Three: Following the Path of the People Before Us?
  • Part Four: The Iman Stimulus Package of Epic Proportions
  • Part Five: Conclusion
  • Now we that we know what ‘izzah is and its importance, let’s examine how we lost it, and how we will insha’Allah once again attain it.

    If it is Islam that elevates us with ‘izzah, and turning to other than Islam for honor that humiliates us, then given that we are in a state of humiliation, it stands to reason we’ve been turning to other than Islam to raise ourselves, to obtain honor, for some time now.

    Just as Abu ‘Ubaydah feared for ‘Umar’s honor based on the state of his clothing, we have also committed the same error, well-intentioned as we are.  How often is the argument made that as Muslims in the West, we must look to how other groups arrived as minorities, struggled, worked their way into the system, and finally gained acceptance?  How often have we heard that we must observe the history of the Jewish community in America, learn its lessons, follow its footsteps, and rise to some fashion of power as they did?  How often have we been told, if only we had a true democracy in our own countries, or if we were just better equipped with secular knowledge, that we would rise to prominence?

    All of this is predicated on the theory of modeling successful people – observe, model, and replicate their behavior to achieve their results.  There is a time and a place for this framework when discussing the modeling of nonMuslims and their success in certain arenas, but as it relates to the matter at hand, returning the Ummah back to its stature of prominence, modeling the nonMuslims both privately and publically will not take us where we want to go.

    Why?  Because for us, the Muslims, acquiring honor through the material or the political when there is no foundation of the spiritual means we will fail, and fail, and fail, and keep failing until we go back to setting our foundation of Islam straight first, and then, with that spiritual base and strength of character, assessing which options are viable.

    Indeed, Allah warned us against falling into this trap of seeking honour in other than Islam:

    Like this?
    Get more of our great articles.

    Give glad tidings to the munaafiqeen (hypocrites) that there is for them a painful punishment – those that take disbelievers as allies instead of the believers. Do they seek with them ‘izzah (honor)? Rather, to Allah indeed belongs all honour! (An-Nisaa’ 4/138-139)

    Today’s housing and credit crisis stands as an amazing example of this phenomenon – how many Muslims, knowing full well that Allah has forbidden interest transactions, bought homes on riba, claiming, “But if I rent, I’ll lose money!”  How many Muslims, for the sake of status, would max out their credit cards, max out the mortgages they could take out to get the best homes with the most lavish (and often gaudiest) options, or take out home equity loans to spend even more money on unneeded “luxuries”.

    My question to those people – are you still making money now?  Where is your status?  Where is your ‘Izzah?  You copied the nonMuslims, set the standard of ‘Izzah according to their rules, and now you’ve lost the game both materially and spiritually, and your debts are piling high, ready to fall upon and crush you.

    So won’t you turn back to Allah now, asking Him to forgive you?  Won’t you set the standard for your actions according to His Criteria, not “their” criteria, whoever “they” are?  Let us all make a concerted effort to turn back to Allah, to understand what He wants from us, and to do our best to make it happen – that’s where our ‘Izzah, our strength, our satisfaction, and security will truly find root, insha’Allah.

    How Long?

    You may then say, ok, so how long do we wait after initiating this process of return?  When will we know we’ve hit critical mass in our return to Islam so that we can move our focus to the next level?  Admittedly, it’s difficult to pinpoint, but here’s a thought – when ‘Umar sent the Muslim armies to fight the Egyptians, a spy from among them observed the Muslims and returned back with the following description:

    “I have seen a people, every one of whom loves death more than he loves life. They cultivate humility rather than pride. None is given to material ambitions. Their mode of living is simple… Their commander is their equal. They make no distinction between superior and inferior, between master and slave. When the time of prayer approaches, none remains behind…”

    Today, our collective religious practice looks nothing like this.  Instead, we send out emails to boycott Starbucks and McDonald’s while the tax money to pay for Israel’s American arsenal falls from our own pockets.  We hold rallies and demonstrations in front of nonMuslims to show how angry we are when we ought to hold rallies and demonstrations in front of our mirrors and put on displays of outrage at the ones who are the root cause of our loss of honor.

    And perhaps worst of all, we write letters and make phone calls to congressman, begging them not to support, even symbolically, the slaughter of our brothers and sisters, or to add insult to injury and call their slaughter “self-defense”.  As the resident scholar in our masjid said in his khutbah, this is humiliation upon humiliation – we are already in a humiliated state, but then we lower ourselves to beggaring for symbolic support at the feet of our ummah’s butchers and their supporters?

    The time has come for us to break free from the shackles of inferiority that have imprisoned our minds, teaching us that Islam is backwards, out-of-touch, impractical, and if not properly modernized and sanitized, barbaric, medieval, dishonorable, and outright embarrassing.  The time has come for us to turn our attention away from that which raises a nonMuslim in this world to that which raises a Muslim in both this world and the next.

    And the answer to your question is a resounding no, we cannot multi-task this one when the overwhelming majority of “Muslims” don’t know well enough to even pray 5 times a day to their Creator.  We know what we have to do – we have to model the best example of bringing Islam from Jahiliyyah, that of the Prophet and the Companions, and we need a practical way to get it done.  We need to plan out an Iman stimulus package of epic proportions.

    In the next part of the series, Siraaj presents the “Iman stimulus package of epic proportions.”

    31 / View Comments

    31 responses to “‘Izzah: Following the Path of the People Before Us?”

    1. Asiyah says:

      Jazakumallahu khairaa brother.May Allah swt grant us honor in this duniya, on the day of judgement and on aakhiraa. waiting for part 3.

    2. Kanika A. says:

      Verily, God does not change men’s condition unless they change their inner selves; and when God wills people to suffer evil in consequence of their own evil deeds, there is none who could avert it for they have none who could protect them from Him. (13:11)

      MashAllah, loving this series :)

    3. Olivia says:

      masha’Allah, excellent! i love how you used that example to “pinpoint”.

    4. Jazzak Allaahu Khayr Siraaj, Many excellent points. Can I clarify one issue? With regard to the history of Jews and other groups in this country, I agree that we should not imagine that they are where we want to be and therefore we should try to follow their example. However, I do believe a close study of their history in this country is warranted. A close critical study would allow us to have a greater idea of some of the issues and challenges that do and will undoubtedly face our community, and we can then see both some things they did well which we should take as an example and mistakes they made, which we should try our best to avoid. Of course, most importantly, as I think you are pointing out here, is that we not take worldly status as the goal towards which we strive or the measure of our success, but rather take obedience to Allaah, individually and collectively, as our objective, and be confident in the knowledge that true success will follow such obedience.

      Do you disagree with any of that?

      • Amad says:

        Very nice article mashallah.

        I strongly agree with Abu Noor though in the issue he raised. There are some things that we should not be emulating the people of book on, but there are other lessons available for us to learn from. Some of the brightest minds and “doers” have been Jews, and their use of the system (available to all) to help their own communities is worth understanding and appreciating, esp. in the arena of politics, media and law. So, I find nothing wrong in saying that we should look at how the Jewish communities legally used the American system to achieve positions of influence in the society. As an example, their position of strength allows them to have a say on Israel that is orders greater than their percent of population. We should also look at how they also participated in community development, something greatly lacking in the Muslim community, but which is also a religious duty of sorts.

        Separating the worldly perspectives and lessons from religious emulation is an important distinction, one that has been made fuzzy sometimes, and to be honest a mix-up that has been also sometimes abused to shut the development of Muslim influences (not referring to this post of course).

        There is no doubt that our end goal is not the duniya, but aren’t you and me struggling for the duniya as well everyday? We have to keep a balance, and I see nothing wrong in aspiring to be the best in your “duniya-capabilities”, while maintaining your Islamic identity.

        • Amad says:

          And perhaps worst of all, we write letters and make phone calls to congressman, begging them not to support, even symbolically, the slaughter of our brothers and sisters, or to add insult to injury and call their slaughter “self-defense”. As the resident scholar in our masjid said in his khutbah, this is humiliation upon humiliation

          I will say that this sort of attitude is not healthy, and emanates from a fundamental misunderstanding of this process. Elected congress officials or any other elected leaders are not “rulers” who we are begging to support or not support. Rather, they are REPRESENTATIVES. Let’s bring this down to a simple classroom example. If we elect a class president to represent us with the teachers or the admin, then it isn’t begging when we ask our elected rep. to do our bidding, but rather our right to do it. These elected reps are “servants of the nation” from a holistic point of view. Some or many may not act like it, but pressure from constituents is not something they easily ignore.

          A hundred letters or calls can actually make these people think twice. Yes, in certain issues, such as Israel, its tougher because our hundred calls are upended by a 1000 from the other party, as well as monumental AIPAC powers. But this doesn’t mean we give up, and lay a red carpet for the other side to do what it wishes. It means we fight harder get a 1000 calls from our side, slowly unpeel power away from AIPAC, and finally strengthen our own institutions. The attitude that somehow doing this makes us inferior or “less superior” is flawed, and actually more defeatist than taking actual action.

          wallahualam

    5. MashaAllah, that was worth reading. :)

      And the answer to your question is a resounding no, we cannot multi-task this one when the overwhelming majority of “Muslims” don’t know well enough to even pray 5 times a day to their Creator.

      Reading the article it occurred to me: How filthy is the Ummah today? The Prophet sull Allaho alayhi wa sallam asked how much filth would be on a man who immersed himself in a river five times a day. And the answer was as obvious then as it is now: the river would wash him clean. And that is the example of salah.

      So to all of you who read this article, are you just splashing in the water, or are you scrubbing? Enroll in Fiqh of Salah in Ohio or Houston (yeah, Houston is at least as big as Ohio, alhamdolillah).

      Get clean.

      And invite your friends: jamat is a river so strong, clear, and fresh that every person you know could be thrown in at once and all of you come out sparkling bi ‘idhnillah.

    6. Siraaj says:

      Salaam alaykum everyone,

      Firstly, thanks to all for taking the time to read the article, greatly appreciated.

      @ Asiyah: Wa iyyakum, and ameen to your du’aas.

      @ Kanika: Glad your enjoying the series, there are two more parts to release, insha’Allah.

      @ Olivia: If my best critic (my wife) liked the article, I know I did something right ;)

      @ Tariq: Yes, the point of salaah, I believe, should be our first lithmus test.

      Siraaj

      • Amad says:

        @ Olivia: If my best critic (my wife) liked the article, I know I did something right

        Siraaj, glad to see both you and your wife use MM to ring up some major brownie points mashallah. May Allah sustain and put barakah in it… at least we can count this as a MM benefit! :)

    7. Suffice it to say that while Amad and I agree on the desirability of studying the history of Jews and other groups in America, we do not necessarily agree on the lessons that studying that history will teach us.

      I don’t want to go down the poltics road right now (maybe I will later on).

      According to survey research only 10 percent of Jews in the U.S. look to religious teaching for guidance on questions of right and wrong. This is lower than other religious groups, but other groups are also amazingly low (Catholics 22 percent). This is despite the fact that 27 percent of Jews and 20 percent of Catholics send their children to religious day schools.

      One of the primary dangers facing the Muslim community in the U.S. is adopting the ethnic group/interest group model of religious identity that groups like ethnic Catholics and Jews have adopted before us. While it may seem that this model has been effective in political organizing or political activism, at the same time a decline in religious belief and practice and worldview has been profound. (I am not necessarily positing that there is a causal relationship here, but I think it’s definitely worth considering). Of course, many would argue that this type of future for Muslims in America is almost inevitable, while individuals may choose, what the environment of living in a modern, secular, western, rich country will do is known. While I certainly agree that Muslims are humans who will have many of the same human traits as any other group, I of course believe that it is our duty to take actions to avoid such a future. Such actions are many and varied, my primary critique with Muslim political involvement and activism is that it distorts and at the very least distracts from this fundamental challenge which is to make Muslims in the U.S. people who maintain, or in many cases, develop an Islamic worldview and do their best to live according to it, seeking the pleasure of Allaah in the process.

      Allaah knows best.

    8. ibnabeeomar says:

      abu noor – awesome comments. you formulated (quite eloquently) in words a lot of what i was thinking but unable to get down properly

    9. Siraaj says:

      @ abu Noor and Amad,

      I’m kind of lumping the two of you together here, hope you don’t mind =)

      Firstly, I’m all for learning and education, period. I think a problem we face right now is that it is in vogue to specialize so deeply in one area of thought or knowledge that it seems people are pidgeonholed by the perspective of their specialty, and as a consequence, their practical decision-making and leadership capability is handicapped by their “blinders”, and I extend this observation not only to Muslim political leaders, but to Muslim scholarship as well. In short, I’m all for learning and bringing different perspectives to the table as we look for practical solutions to our current state.

      My problem is with application. The post I wrote above was general (finance, politics, etc), but let’s focus in on politics for a moment. I believe before we can get into politics, we have to first examine our own ethical framework as Muslims and define what is acceptable and what is not for us before even setting foot into the arena. After this is done, I believe we can observe the history of each group, and look for acceptable solutions (because not all “legal solutions” are necessarily halaal solutions) with limits defined for engagement.

      Instead, what appears to be happening is that we first define a solution we found someone else using successfully, and then we implement it without quite understanding whether it is correct or not.

      What I want to see is that we first define who we are, and what we stand for unabashedly, and then move forward with an agenda that doesn’t cut corners along the way. Incorporate the lessons of nonMuslims where appropriate, but let’s be sure we know what we can keep and what we can leave behind. I recall at Ilm Summit, Shaykh Yasir invited a brother to speak who was actively involved in politics within the democratic party, and he made the point that I’m sure you believe in as well – you can’t affect the discourse if you’re not in the game. But funnily enough, he didn’t want us to publically announce in any way that he was speaking at our event because he was afraid of the association with our more “conservative” organization. Give that some thought – if that’s what it takes to be politically involved, to disassociate yourself from “fundamentalism” for the “greater good”, is that really the type of engagement you want? I like engagement the way I’ve proposed it, and not the way it’s currently handled.

      And, I call for the same framework of thought to be applied to our financial dealings as well (mortgages, 401ks, stocks, bonds, t-bills, mutual funds, options, etc). First define what is right, and then move forward.

      Siraaj

    10. Siraaj says:

      LOL, Abu Noor, you beat me to it =)

      I will say that this sort of attitude is not healthy, and emanates from a fundamental misunderstanding of this process. Elected congress officials or any other elected leaders are not “rulers” who we are begging to support or not support. Rather, they are REPRESENTATIVES. Let’s bring this down to a simple classroom example. If we elect a class president to represent us with the teachers or the admin, then it isn’t begging when we ask our elected rep. to do our bidding, but rather our right to do it. These elected reps are “servants of the nation” from a holistic point of view. Some or many may not act like it, but pressure from constituents is not something they easily ignore.

      A hundred letters or calls can actually make these people think twice. Yes, in certain issues, such as Israel, its tougher because our hundred calls are upended by a 1000 from the other party, as well as monumental AIPAC powers. But this doesn’t mean we give up, and lay a red carpet for the other side to do what it wishes. It means we fight harder get a 1000 calls from our side, slowly unpeel power away from AIPAC, and finally strengthen our own institutions. The attitude that somehow doing this makes us inferior or “less superior” is flawed, and actually more defeatist than taking actual action.

      Well, I suppose if we take a strict definition of begging, it might not be as appropriate :D I will admit, there is hyberbole in the use of the word, but the point is that we are a powerless group looking for help from people we know consider us as political liabilities, so in essence, I still agree with the “humiliation upon humliation” statement.

      Siraaj

    11. Qas says:

      Assalamualaikum,

      JazakaAllah khair Siraaj for the article. May Allah reward you greatly.

      In your latest comment you said, “First define what is right, and then move forward”. Do you mean by this to ask and answer all the “what if” questions and then move forward? Or, is it more about laying down uncompromisable principles before engagement? If its the former, don’t we have a model of that already in the formulations of the madhahib and closing of the doors of ijtihad. If its the former, wouldn’t it involve the formulation of novel maqasids? If that is the case, than do you think given our disunity, do you think that it is practically plausible?

      The above questions are really conversational questions rather than challenges or anything like that.

      Masalama bro

    12. Instead, what appears to be happening is that we first define a solution we found someone else using successfully, and then we implement it without quite understanding whether it is correct or not.

      I share your concerns about such an approach and that may be a small part of what is going on. As for most of what is going on, I’m afraid that it’s even worse than this — I think Muslims are just doing the “political” thing because this is what is done in this country and most Muslims like most people just do what they see other people doing without putting the level of thought, reflection, or justification into it that you are describing here.

      In a larger measure, I think we agree Siraaj but I think we have to think even deeper than what some of your comments may indicate. Though this is the level where I think another interesting tension emerges. There can sometimes be a tension between thinking about where we want the Muslim community to be or preserving just the self interest of the community (again this can lead dangerously close to an ethnic group/interest group model) as opposed to having a vision for the entire society which would be very long term and thinking about actions in that framework.

      By the way, I’m always happy to be lumped together with my dear brother Amad, but when you make this statement I would assume you’re addressing to him

      I recall at Ilm Summit, Shaykh Yasir invited a brother to speak who was actively involved in politics within the democratic party, and he made the point that I’m sure you believe in as well – you can’t affect the discourse if you’re not in the game.

      since I quite vocally disagreed with that speaker at the time :) (May Allaah accept his sincere efforts)

      Finally, I think your emphasis that this should not be just limited to politics is quite profound, since as hard as it may seem to believe, with as little productive discussion as the Muslim community has had around political engagement, just the sheer amount of conversation that has been had around this issue has meant that we’re further along in that area than in some other equally important areas — in most areas the lack of deep visionary thinking is much more of a problem.

      In addition to financial matters, there are broad areas such as education and entertainment/culture that deserve the same treatment. (All areas on which I know you have been involved Siraaj as have many others who visit Muslim Matters.

    13. ibnkhalil says:

      Assalam o alaykum, I really love the article. WE are the best of mankind.

      I would humbly disagree that Salah is the most important. The most important is belief. Strong belief entails strong actions. Issues of Aqeedah have become so oblivious and perverted to us that we have lost our respect and honor. In our community people have openly started rejecting al wala wal bara which such a fundamental concept and without which a person’s iman is not complete.

      What will make people pray salah? It is knowing the reward and punishment of it. If you truly believe in something you will do it regardless the pain or ease, because you know that this belief is flawless and the promise of Allah is true. You will fear Allah and love Him.

      Collective practice requires collective belief. This is the first thing Allah stresses and then deeds. Without belief deeds are null. The opposite may not necessarily be true.

      Wallah u alam

    14. Siraaj says:

      salaam alaykum ibn khalil,

      Please read the last few lines of my post akhi – we’re not in disagreeement ;)

      Siraaj

    15. Siraaj says:

      Assalamualaikum,

      JazakaAllah khair Siraaj for the article. May Allah reward you greatly.

      In your latest comment you said, “First define what is right, and then move forward”. Do you mean by this to ask and answer all the “what if” questions and then move forward? Or, is it more about laying down uncompromisable principles before engagement? If its the former, don’t we have a model of that already in the formulations of the madhahib and closing of the doors of ijtihad. If its the former, wouldn’t it involve the formulation of novel maqasids? If that is the case, than do you think given our disunity, do you think that it is practically plausible?

      The above questions are really conversational questions rather than challenges or anything like that.

      Masalama bro

      Walaykum as salaam akhi Qas, wa iyyakum and ameen to your du’aas =)

      Well, the question always comes first, right? :D In saying “First define what is right, and then move forward”, what I’m looking for is that each issue is critically evaluated objectively under a methodology adopted as appropriate by scholars resident to the United States. This is where Amad’s question becomes relevant – shouldn’t we use the data acquired from previous experience to inform our decisions? I would think it would be relevant in defining viable options for engagement (and disqualifying others). So who determines that Islamic scholarship that helps us define our engagement when no one wants to listen to anyone except either themselves or those whom they trust exclusively?

      That’s where your question becomes most relevent – what good is any of it without unity? It’s not, and that’s why I prioritize the spreading of Iman among the masses first in a concentrated dose / effort before anything else. There’s no guarantee you’ll have unity if every single Muslim prayed 5 times daily (history bears that out), but expecting it under current conditions…no way. I want to first work towards positive spiritual engagement (because this is our foundation), and once this is done, I’m confident that the appropriate leadership will be given to us by Allah subhaanaa wa ta’aala to direct us where we need to go. Our Muslim leadership domestically and abroad are reflections of its people.

      And that is a bitter pill to swallow – that we are responsible for where we are. But it is also empowering because if we can patiently maintain a long-range view, then we also have the potential to be the catalysts that change our situation for the better, rather than letting it plummet to further depths.

      Siraaj

    16. Siraaj says:

      Salaam alaykum Abu Noor,

      Finally, I think your emphasis that this should not be just limited to politics is quite profound, since as hard as it may seem to believe, with as little productive discussion as the Muslim community has had around political engagement, just the sheer amount of conversation that has been had around this issue has meant that we’re further along in that area than in some other equally important areas — in most areas the lack of deep visionary thinking is much more of a problem.

      In addition to financial matters, there are broad areas such as education and entertainment/culture that deserve the same treatment. (All areas on which I know you have been involved Siraaj as have many others who visit Muslim Matters.

      Subhaanallah, profound? When I wrote that, I thought I was beating a dead horse!

      Siraaj

    17. AnonyMouse says:

      @ the issue of unity

      One thought which has been wiggling about in my brain is, what kind of unity do we want to achieve? Can we achieve?
      We have so many different groups amongst the Muslims, from the progressives (okay maybe they don’t even count) to the liberal intellectual types to the feel-good warm-and-fuzzy Sufis (oooh I’m gonna get blasted for this) to the Sufi-leaning traditionalists to the conservatives to the Salafis to the super-Salafis to the… whichever group I’ve left out. And as we’ve seen over and over, as much as we try to remain respectful of each other (or not), we will always have major fundamental disagreements particularly in the ideology/ mentality departments.

      This in turn affects our ability to formulate and implement a long-term goal and vision, as I rather doubt that will we ever be able to agree on one specific vision for Muslims in the West. The fact that we all have different ideas and mentalities is a serious obstacle to this, as almost every group or person, whether they admit it or not, will never be able to fully compromise or tone down their beliefs and rejection of the other groups’ ideas in order to “unify.” We call for unity, but what does that really mean? It seems that every group just wants everyone else to join their side, which is basically what everyone’s goal is anyway because we all believe that our side is the right side.

      I’m beginning to wonder and doubt if unity will ever be achieved amongst the Muslims of this Ummah. And if that’s so, what will that mean for us? I strongly doubt that we will be able to implement and achieve a single vision for Muslims in the West – perhaps some of it will be achieved, by one group or another; but never on an idealistic mass scale spanning the continent(s). Maybe the former is the best we can hope for, to whatever extent it can reach and whatever heights it can achieve.

      My apologies for the disconnected rambling and hijacking the thread!

    18. ibnkhalil says:

      @Siraaj
      Oh! my apologies. I completely forgot the last part of the post and also the fact that there is more to this with the Iman stimulus package! I will withdraw my comment. JazakAllah khair!

    19. Siraaj says:

      One thought which has been wiggling about in my brain is, what kind of unity do we want to achieve? Can we achieve?
      We have so many different groups amongst the Muslims, from the progressives (okay maybe they don’t even count) to the liberal intellectual types to the feel-good warm-and-fuzzy Sufis (oooh I’m gonna get blasted for this) to the Sufi-leaning traditionalists to the conservatives to the Salafis to the super-Salafis to the… whichever group I’ve left out. And as we’ve seen over and over, as much as we try to remain respectful of each other (or not), we will always have major fundamental disagreements particularly in the ideology/ mentality departments.

      Well, I guess everyone will just have to wait until the next part to see how that question is addressed, right (super cliffhanger!)?

      Siraaj

    20. AsimG says:

      Asalaamu Alaykum Siraaj,

      Awesome article masha’Allah!

      But here’s an important question (which insha’Allah will be answered in the next article):

      Why do so many continue to diagnose the “main problems” of our ummah, but RARELY give out practical solutions?

      A call to pray 5 times a day…ok good, but what is a PRACTICAL solution to inspire people to pray.

      The solutions that we are actually given are so far-fetched, unrealistic, unattainable, radical and sometimes even unIslamic (i.e. Irshad Manji wants a gay protestant-like reformation, Hizbut Tahrir wants to overthrow the Muslim leaders and establish a khalifah, jihadis want to kill the kuffar etc etc etc.) that it makes the whole process of problem-solving look like a joke.

      Oh and why is everything always so negative. What is wrong with the Muslim world?
      Why not What is RIGHT with the Muslim world and HOW WE CAN GET BETTER

    21. Siraaj says:

      Why do so many continue to diagnose the “main problems” of our ummah, but RARELY give out practical solutions?

      A call to pray 5 times a day…ok good, but what is a PRACTICAL solution to inspire people to pray.

      I dunno, you’ll have to ask them :D As for the next part of this series, an attempt is made to do just that. Even if it’s not agreed upon, I hope it’ll spark some discussion and debate, insha’Allah ;)

      Siraaj

    22. All Praise is for Allah says:

      Our problem is one of spirituality.
      If a man comes to speak to me about
      the reforms to be undertaken in the
      Muslim world, about political strategies
      and of great geo-strategic plans, my
      first question to him would be whether
      he performed the dawn prayer in its time

      – Said Ramadan, son of Hassan al Banna

    23. Brother says:

      Salam aleykum,

      MashaAllah, very good article, now we are talking about the real cause of the situation of our Ummah.

      One point though, I don’t really agree with the comment on the boycott, saying that it does not make sense to call for boycott when we give taxes for Israel. This argument does not work:
      – firstly you cannot really avoid paying taxes but you can avoid given money to McDonald’s,
      – secondly if let’s say I spend 1000 for taxes and 500 for “zionist products” in the year, saying “because I pay the 1000 it does not make sense to call for not paying the other 500” is not a valid argument.

      BUT I do agree with the fact that it does not make real sense to tell people to boycott when they don’t even pray or are involved in the deen, it’s like going the other way around.

      This goes back to what Said Ramadan (rahimahullah) (cf previous comment) – by the way, he is not his son, but he was his “student” so to speak, very close to him, and he married his daughter.

      Wa Allahu a’lam

      Looking forward to the next article.

      Wassalam

    24. Siraaj says:

      Salaam alaykum brother

      Jazakallaah khayr for stopping by and offering your thoughts.

      One point though, I don’t really agree with the comment on the boycott, saying that it does not make sense to call for boycott when we give taxes for Israel. This argument does not work:
      – firstly you cannot really avoid paying taxes but you can avoid given money to McDonald’s,
      – secondly if let’s say I spend 1000 for taxes and 500 for “zionist products” in the year, saying “because I pay the 1000 it does not make sense to call for not paying the other 500″ is not a valid argument.

      I’m often criticized when I bring this point up to others, and I can see the perspective of others when they say as you’ve said.

      My point is this – we’re being penny wise and pound foolish. The US sends in billions in aid, Starbucks’s CEO, not necessarily the company, supports Israel, and even if they did, it’s pennies vs dollars here. McDonald’s shouldn’t even be mentioned in this discussion of companies supporting israel since it’s false.

      I contend that if we REALLY care about not sending money to Israel, then we ought to find an alternative country to live in. Hijrah to a Muslim or nonMuslim land, doesn’t really matter, so long as we can practice our faith. On the other hand, if we’re going to make peace with the idea of living in America, then I think we should get over thinking that Muslims in America boycotting these companies will impact them, or change our situation. I think the energy is better spent in raising our Eman rather than expending energy and debate wondering who supports Israel and how to take them down.

      Siraaj

      PS – However, I don’t buy starbucks anyway, their coffee is way overpriced, and I don’t like the taste – Dunkin Donuts Medium Hot Coffee, Lotsa Cream, 4 Splendas, mmmm…2nd place is McDonald’s small coffee, 3 creams, 4 splendas. Excellent stuff!

    25. ALGEBRA says:

      Aslamu-alaikum:
      Hey did anyone read this story…… Truly inspiring…………..seriously………….. that is how we should be.
      http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/pakistan/punjab/mukhtar-mai-victim-married-for-womens-rights-ha
      salam

    26. […] ‘Izzah: Following the Path of the People Before Us? | MuslimMatters.org […]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *