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You Are Perfectly Created

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In many verses of the Quran the human being has been described by Allah as being created in the best form, or created perfectly:

“We have indeed created humankind in the best of molds.”
Quran 95:4 (Surat At-Tin, The Fig)

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and:

“Then We made the sperm into a clot of congealed blood; then of that clot We made a (foetus) lump; then we made out of that lump bones and clothed the bones with flesh; then we developed out of it another creature. So blessed be Allah, the best to create!”
(Quran 23:14) (Surat Al-Mu’minun, The Believers)

and:

“The work of Allah who has perfected everything (He created).
Qur’an 27:88 (An-Naml, The Ant)

and:

“He is the One Who has made perfectly everything He has created: He began the creation of human beings with clay, And made his progeny from a quintessence of the nature of a fluid despised: But He fashioned him in due proportion, and breathed into him something of His spirit…”
Quran 32:7-9 (As-Sajdah, the Prostration)

These ayaat do not speak only of the human being’s physical form. The perfection of man and woman includes the human spirit; the human will; the human emotional capacity, intellectual drive, innate curiosity, desire to excel, ability to love without bounds; and our yearning for Allah, even when we do not recognize it.

Allah is speaking of you.

Not some random historical human being. Not only Adam and Hawaa. Not only the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him).

You.

Discarding negative self-conceptions

So often we are critical of ourselves. We call ourselves stupid – I do this sometimes when I forget something, smacking my forehead and saying, “Ah, I’m an idiot!”

We find fault with our bodies, sometimes severely so. I certainly have had issues of insecurity surrounding my body. I think all of us do, unless we are Olympic athletes.

Sometimes, when we fail at something, we wonder what’s wrong with us, why can’t we do this or that as well as other people?

Have we ever considered that such negative self-conceptions contradict our faith?

Aren’t we Muslim? Don’t we believe in Allah, and in the Quran? Yes? Then we must believe that we were created perfectly. We were created by the Master Creator who does not make errors.

Allah made no mistakes when He made you.

Your spirit is perfect, your soul is perfect, your mind is perfect, your heart is perfect, and even your body is perfect.

Allah says that He breathed into us something of His spirit! Do we realize how immense that is, how profound, how awesome? Allah the Eternal, The First and The Last, The Majestic, The Omnipotent, has breathed a part of His spirit into Bani Adam, this little two-legged creature of clay, and made us perfect. Me, you, our children and friends, our neighbors and co-workers, and even drug addicts, thieves, torturers and tortured, abusers of every stripe, and everyone walking this earth, believers and disbelievers, were all created perfect in every way. It’s hard to wrap our minds around that. But we must accept it as an article of faith.

In case we have any doubt, let’s look at the ayah above from Surat At-Tin again, but this time with the preceding verses included:

“By the fig and the olive, and the Mount Sina, and this city of peace (Makkah), We have indeed created humankind in the best of molds.”

Allah is declaring an oath by some of the most powerful symbols in existence (an explanation of these symbols is a matter for another article) that humankind was created in the best of molds. When Allah swears in this way it is because He wants to you sit up and open your mind to what is being said; to accept it wholeheartedly and draw it into your chest; and not to have an atom of doubt.

Of course that doesn’t mean that everything you do is perfect. It refers to your capacities, your potential. You were created without flaw, with a pure soul imbued with fitra, a powerful mind, and a body whose magic is still not understood by modern science. You are perfectly capable of fulfilling every obligation that Allah has laid on you; of bearing any burden that is laid on your shoulders; and of achieving any noble dream that Allah has placed in your heart.

What does it mean for us?

So what does that mean for me and you to see ourselves as perfect? I am asking seriously and rhetorically. What does it mean when we can’t fall back on self-pity? What does it mean when we are no longer allowed to view ourselves as flawed?

What does it mean when we have to accept that we can achieve any “crazy dream” that may smolder in our hearts? What does it mean when we look at ourselves in the mirror and see perfect, beautiful faces, no matter the shape of our features? What does it mean when we realize that we have within ourselves the capacity to reach the same heights of imaan (faith) as the sahabah, or the same level of intellectual rigor as Imam Al-Bukhari or Sheikh ibn Taymiyyah, or the same purity and unwavering trust as Sayyidna Maryam? (may Allah be pleased with her).

Do we begin to see that they were simply human beings who acknowledged the perfection with which Allah created them? They strove their utmost to live up to that perfection, placing no boundaries or limitations upon themselves. They were not extraordinary people in their creation; they were only extraordinary because they accepted Allah’s words and thrust themselves utterly into the river of the Quran (or in Maryam’s case, immersed herself completely in tawakkul [trust in Allah], and taqwa [consciousness of Allah], allowing themselves to expand to fill the capacity of the flawless mold that Allah created them in, and refusing to allow themselves to be defined or demeaned by anyone else’s opinion. Nor did they allow themselves to be mentally or spiritually diminished or damaged by the harsh circumstances of life.

We have the same option. You, me, all of us.

You are perfect, whether you admit it or not. Go with it. Live up to it. It’s not a burden but a liberty. It is the freedom to be who Allah put you on this earth to be. It’s the freedom to dream and achieve without the chains of self-doubt or self-deprecation. It’s the freedom to accept yourself, love yourself, and allow yourself to love others fee-sabeel-illah, in Allah’s cause, and to live a full life of meaning and worth.

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Wael Abdelgawad's novels can be purchased at his author page at Amazon.com: Wael is an Egyptian-American living in California. He is the founder of several Islamic websites, including, Zawaj.com, IslamicAnswers.com and IslamicSunrays.com. He teaches martial arts, and loves Islamic books, science fiction, and ice cream. Learn more about him at WaelAbdelgawad.com. For a guide to all of Wael's online stories in chronological order, check out this handy Story Index.

49 Comments

49 Comments

  1. Sally

    April 29, 2010 at 7:42 AM

    Nice thoughts to reflect on..although that’s not the complete story! I am always impressed with the depth of emotion and intellect that Allah allows us to feel. Part of the human experience IS to feel fear, doubt, and all the shades of gray.

    • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

      April 29, 2010 at 2:33 PM

      You know you’re right, I never thought about emotion in that way.

    • Fozia

      April 30, 2010 at 3:11 PM

      Sally – your comments are so simple, yet I found them the most meaningful of all. Allah (swt) has made us as humans not angels; hence we are open to feeling both ‘hope’ and ‘fear’. Recognising that these different feelings are part of our natural make up is so very important as it helps us to understand others and to show tolerance.

      If we came near to perfect, Allah(swt) would replace us with another nation. Our fears and hopes make us what we are; our lives are continuous struggles where inshaAllah we strive to become better, we strive to let go of our fears and find hope in Allah. Its like climbing a ladder, our fears sometimes make us drop a few steps down, then hope gives us the strength to climb up again.

      Having such reminders helps to strengthen me in finding courage. I hope we can always be grateful that Allah has given us this understanding of deen and that we use it to help others climb the same ladder too.

      This is a beautifully written article which touches deep in the soul as I find with all of Br Wael’s pieces of work.

      • Sally

        April 30, 2010 at 3:23 PM

        Alhamdulillah..I appreciate your saying that. Clarity & simplicity are what i strive for as I figure out the world in thought and writing :)

      • elham

        April 30, 2010 at 5:58 PM

        Reminded me of this hadith,

        Narrated by Abu Ayyoob & Abu Hurayrah :-

        The Prophet PBUH said: ”If you did not commit sins, Allah would sweep you out of existence and replace you by another people who would commit sins, ask for Allah’s forgiveness and He would forgive them.”
        Sahih Muslim (Eng. trans. vol.4 pp.1436-7 nos.6620-2).

  2. Tariq

    April 29, 2010 at 8:50 AM

    MashaAllah, very well written and motivational. People should stand up when they read this one!

    • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

      April 29, 2010 at 2:33 PM

      Jazak Allah khayr. This is my first article published here at MuslimMatters, so I was nervous about what sort of response I would get. I will take everyone’s comments to heart, good or bad. Thank you.

  3. Hafsa

    April 29, 2010 at 8:54 AM

    Jazakallahukhair for posting this! Beautifully written!

  4. Mariam E.

    April 29, 2010 at 9:14 AM

    Asalamu Alikum warahmatu Allah

    Jazakum Allah khayr for this article.

    Sometimes, when we fail at something, we wonder what’s wrong with us, why can’t we do this or that as well as other people?

    Have we ever considered that such negative self-conceptions contradict our faith?

    The above statements are probably applicable only to those things that Allah has decreed and we have no control to change, such as physical characteristics.

    But there are matters that we have control in changing, by Allah’s will. If I were to fail at something, a step in the right direction would be to actually blame myself and wonder what went wrong that caused me to fail.

    It is not contradictory to our faith, for example, to reflect as to why a certain individual is able to achieve a lot in their day, while another is unable to achieve a good amount in the same day.

    Or another example: to wonder what is wrong with us that we cannot reach the same level of knowledge as our righteous predecessors or some of our contemporary scholars,

    This would not be a negative self-conception. Rather, it is a way of improving ourselves.

    In the end, self-confidence is praiseworthy, but we must realize its has limits and acknowledge that we are still humans and cannot accomplish anything except by the Help of our Creator. It was from the prayer of Rasulullah sallaAllahu alayhe wasallam,

    اللَّهُمَّ رَحْمَتَكَ أَرْجُو فَلا تَكِلْنِي إِلَى نَفْسِي طَرْفَةَ عَيْنٍ وَأَصْلِحْ لِي شَأْنِي كُلَّهُ لا إِلَهَ إِلا أَنْتَ

    “O Allah, for Your mercy I hope, so do not leave me in charge of my affairs even for the blink of an eye; rectify all my affairs. There is no god except You.” waAllahu ta’ala A’lam

    Once again, jazakum Allah khayr for a well-written, thought provoking article.

    • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

      April 29, 2010 at 2:37 PM

      Good point Mariam, we are of course limited by our nature and our Qadr. But even then we should not ask, “What’s wrong with me?” Instead we should strive to see that everyone is gifted in different ways. One person might have the gift of language, another might have a powerful analytical mind, another might be a talented artist, another might excel at mathematics or memorizing Quran, or even might have a natural rapport with children and be able to raise them and teach them well.

  5. Plamienka

    April 29, 2010 at 9:46 AM

    “Allah says that He breathed into us something of His spirit! ”
    Uff, Im quite unease with this formulation – which is the relation of Allah and His spirit?
    I was always taught that Allah´s spirit = Gabriel.
    so Im quite confused by this phrase. sounds totally Christian to me.
    Can you please be more exact?

    • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

      April 29, 2010 at 3:01 PM

      Plamienka, I can understand your unease. Please note that this phrase comes from the Quran:

      “He is the One Who has made perfectly everything He has created: He began the creation of human beings with clay, And made his progeny from a quintessence of the nature of a fluid despised: But He fashioned him in due proportion, and breathed into him something of His spirit…”

      Quran 32:7-9 (As-Sajdah, the Prostration)

      The word in Arabic is ruh. Tafsir al-Jalalayn says about this ayah, “Then He proportioned him, that is to say, He created Adam, and breathed into him of His spirit, in other words, He made him a living sensory being after having been an inanimate thing. And He made for you, in other words, for [you] his descendants, hearing, meaning, ears, and sight and hearts.”

      Answering a question about this on Reading Islam, Ebrahim Kazim explained, “If Allah had not breathed into the mold of clay from His own ruh, we human beings would have been statues of clay without any life and without soul. In this breath that comes from Allah and which we call ruh is embodied whatever potential good and positive qualities human beings possess. These must have been present in this ruh…”

  6. elham

    April 29, 2010 at 2:41 PM

    MashAllah, Uplifting, jazaAllah khairan

  7. Plamienka

    April 29, 2010 at 4:31 PM

    Dear Wael,

    Im deeply sorry, but I still feel some unease – I try to explain you why:

    16:102. Say, Ruh-ul-Qudus (the Holy Spirit) has brought it (the Qur’an) down from your Lord with truth, that it
    may make firm and strengthen (the Faith of) those who believe and as a guidance and glad tidings to those who
    have submitted (to Allâh as Muslims) 1. The obvious point that the critic is missing is that the ‘Holy Spirit’ is simply another
    title of Angel Jibreel (Gabriel), peace be upon him. This is unanimously agreed upon by all Muslim scholars and there is
    no difference of opinion on this matter due to what has been narrated. Ibn Kathir Ad-Damishqee (d. 1372CE) cites the
    narrations which demonstrate that this was the understanding of the earliest Muslim generation, those who learnt directly
    from the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him): Jibril is Ruh Al-Qudus

    What I do not understand here – sorry, Im new in Islam, have patience with me.
    but according to this Quranic Ayah and the tafseer of Ibn Kathir is Jibril is Ruh Al-Qudus.
    so our ruh is part of Jibril?
    or Jibril is part of Allah? or ruh is part of allah?
    tnx for your explanation

    jazaAllah khairan

    • MW_M

      April 29, 2010 at 5:02 PM

      Perhaps it would be better to have one of the shuyookh explain it Br. Wael rather than us laypeople try to give our interpretation.

    • Asiya

      April 29, 2010 at 5:23 PM

      Br./Sr. Plamienka,

      As salaam alaikum. InshaAllah I will try my best to answer your question.

      I think the part where you’re confused is the word “from” in the verse. The word used in the Arabic is مِنْ (min) which means from. The word does not mean Jibreel ‘alaihi salaam is part of Allah in some way because this word (min) is not used in that way in Arabic. The ayah means that Allah sent the message via Jibreel so Jibreel ‘alaihi salaam taught the message to the Prophet salallahu alaihi wa salaam which is FROM Allah ‘azzawajal. Therefore, Jibreel ‘alaihi salaam is not part of Allah.

      Also we know that Allah is unique, alone without any partners. To say that Jibreel and Allah are part of the same would be wrong, even if you thought about it logically. Jibreel is under the command of Allah. Allah created Jibreel, so how can something created be part of the Creator? Jibreel ‘alaihi salaam will always be in existence as long as Allah wills but Allah is Ever-Living.

      Also, the title of Rooh Al Qudoos is a special title given to the angel Jibreel ‘alaihi salaam. However the rooh which I think you’re referring to is the rooh (or soul) of the individual. No, these are 2 different things (we’re not part angel). I took the class Meaningful Prayer from Bayyinah Institute and we were taught why Jibreel is called Rooh. The word “rooh” in arabic comes from the root which means comfort and ease. So what is the connection between that root and the word rooh? Whenever Jibreel comes down with revelation it brings comfort to the believers.

      InshaAllah I hope this clears up any doubts you may have.

      On a sidenote, this is an example where translations can confuse a person. Whoever is able to learn the Quran from the Arabic should do so without delay! You don’t know what you’re missing. =)

  8. Umm Bilqis

    April 30, 2010 at 12:33 AM

    In a world where many diminish the self worth of others, It is the Creator’s religion that tells us to look beyond the superficial and strive.
    Jazak’Allah khayran brother, for this article and may Allah reward you for your efforts.

  9. Plamienka

    April 30, 2010 at 2:21 AM

    Dear Asyia, tnx for your reply,

    but stil Im stuck – what is the difference between the His spirit, that was given us as the rooh and our rooh?
    because logically (I studied mathematics, I was told that Islam is straight, easy and logical and such thing as above is highly unclear and upsetting to me)

    “Also, the title of Rooh Al Qudoos is a special title given to the angel Jibreel ‘alaihi salaam. However the rooh which I think you’re referring to is the rooh (or soul) of the individual. No, these are 2 different things (we’re not part angel).”

    so let it summarize – if something is called by the same name, it is assumed and in most of the times it is that they are the same or at least they are very similar.
    so for me – Rooh al Quddus may be used as the title for Jibreel, but at the same it is highly confusing to use the same word – Rooh for the part of His spirit, that was breathed into us.

    So if we are not part of an angel, there is only other possibility left – we have in us part of Allah – therefore the oneness of Allah is quite compromised.
    There is no other logical possibility.

    “On a sidenote, this is an example where translations can confuse a person. Whoever is able to learn the Quran from the Arabic should do so without delay! You don’t know what you’re missing. =)”
    I do not think that this is only solution. I searched 3 English translations plus relevant tafseers.
    and if the logic is ok, language does not change much.”
    I worked as translator, so I know how it works…

    Tnx in advance for your response.

    jazaAllah khairan

    • elham

      April 30, 2010 at 5:45 PM

      salamu alaikum palmienka,

      I don’t have the answer, but what does the knowledge of this benefit you? I mean if you understood that we have the Creator’s rooh in us or not , then what would you do?

      To me, its just non-benefcial knowledge, as it wouldn’t change anything.

      And also didn’t Allah (swt) say:

      {And they ask you (O Muhammad صلى الله عليه Ùˆ سلم) concerning the ruh (the Spirit); Say: “The ruh (the Spirit) is one of the things, the knowledge of which is only with my Lord. And of knowledge, you (mankind) have been given only a little.} (Surah Al-Isra 17:85)

      • Plamienka

        May 1, 2010 at 7:40 AM

        I was told that Islam is logical and simply. I see when I ve scratched a bit deeper, I found whole tin of worms (contradictions).
        “I don’t have the answer, but what does the knowledge of this benefit you?” – the same kind of answer I received from Christians when I ve asked about Trinity.

        “I mean if you understood that we have the Creator’s rooh in us or not , then what would you do?”
        Basically it is important. our nafs (soul ) is immortal – so is Allah.
        If I do not know for sure, that we – I have something that He gave me, a part of Himself, how can I feel obliged to Him?
        if my logical and spiritual functions are not surely from Him (and as I see, this cannot be easily defined in Islam), how can I acknowledge Him as my Creator, when I have doubts if He really gave me my soul?
        I did a big research on it, but it is even more confusing than Trinity and Trinity is pretty confusing thing.
        thanx you all for your effort, but I have discovered, thanx to you that islam is surely not for me.

        • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

          May 1, 2010 at 11:44 AM

          This person is clearly a troll and never was Muslim to start with. I suspected that from his first comment.

          • elham

            May 1, 2010 at 12:13 PM

            lol br wael, i noticed from the dramatic ending in their comment and the ”tin of worms”.

        • Sayf

          May 1, 2010 at 1:27 PM

          Basically it is important. our nafs (soul ) is immortal – so is Allah.

          No, this is not true. When the first trumpet is blown everything dies except for Allah subhana wat’ala.

          So if we are not part of an angel, there is only other possibility left – we have in us part of Allah – therefore the oneness of Allah is quite compromised.
          There is no other logical possibility.

          This is called the logical fallacy of a false dichotomy.
          http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies/false-dilemma.html
          You set it up that we’re either part angel or part divine, not part angel thus divine? No, we’re neither angels nor divine, we’re human. The ruh is from Allah, not a piece of his divinity.

          As you can see from the Ayah brother Wael quoted you see “min” before “ruh” and sister Asiya did a nice job of explaining the meaning of “min” in the context of another verse:

          I think the part where you’re confused is the word “from” in the verse. The word used in the Arabic is مِنْ (min) which means from.

          It’s really very simple. Just like your eyes and ears are from Allah subhana wat’ala, so is your soul. Ultimately, everything is from Allah and nothing shares in his Divinity.

          if my logical and spiritual functions are not surely from Him (and as I see, this cannot be easily defined in Islam), how can I acknowledge Him as my Creator, when I have doubts if He really gave me my soul?

          I think that would be the logical fallacy of an irrelevant conclusion. You were asking if the ruh given to us is from him or a part of him. The answer is that it is from him, and has nothing to do with souls being divine. Even with the opposite conclusion however, the soul is still given to you by him, so the conclusion you’re stating above has absolutely nothing to do with the discussion in question.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignoratio_elenchi

          thanx to you that islam is surely not for me.

          Maybe Wael is on to something and this is just trolling. Even if that’s not the case, it doesn’t look like someone is being sincere because you’ve jumped on the apostasy bandwagon so fast (for something so serious) with so many logical fallacies. It would seem like there is some deeper reason for this than the discussion in question.

          Regardless, the previous commenters did an excellent job and you’re responsible for your own actions, so don’t try to dump it on others and make them feel bad.

          Allahua ‘alm

  10. Umm Bilqis

    April 30, 2010 at 2:58 AM

    “The nafs and the ruh”
    By Abu Bilal Mustafa Al Kanadi:

    http://www.angelfire.com/al/islamicpsychology/introduction/nafs_and_ruh.html

    Also another article on Ruh Quddus:

    http://quran-hadith-studies.suite101.com/article.cfm/al_quddus

    Hope that helps, will find other sources that are more comprehensive if there is a need.

  11. iman

    April 30, 2010 at 3:24 PM

    asalaamualaikum,

    this was just beautiful mashAllah. i’ve struggled a lot with self-confidence and self-esteem, and really needed this reminder. jazakAllahu khair for posting this.

  12. sister

    April 30, 2010 at 6:48 PM

    Jazakallahu khairaa .It`s one of a kind article.I never thought about these ayahs from this point of view.Subahanallah everyone is so unique. May Allah help us realize all the blessings he has bestowed on us and make all of us from his thankful servants.

    salaam.

  13. Mr. Muslim

    May 1, 2010 at 4:47 PM

    “Allah says that He breathed into us something of His spirit! Do we realize how immense that is, how profound, how awesome? … But we must accept it as an article of faith.”

    Hang on a tick, I don’t think that’s quite right. In fact I thought it was quite dodgy but I don’t trust my own knowledge so I’ve looked it up:

    From Fundamentals of Tawhid, by Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Phillips, page 187/188 onwards, talking about the evidences which people who say it is possible to achieve union with Allah (a’oodhubillah). Quotes are in bold.:

    “Then He proportioned him and breathed into him from His [created] soul and made for you hearing and vision and hearts; little are you grateful.” 32:9

    “And when I have proportioned him and breathed into him of My [created] soul, then fall down to him in prostration.” 15:29

    (Note how this translation (from Quran.com) mentions that this soul is created.)

    …have been used as evidence for the belief that every human being contains within his body a part of God….

    …However, this is not the case. Possessive pronouns in Arabic, as in English, have two general meanings depending on the context in which they are used. They may describe an attribute or possesion which is not a part of it’s owner.

    And so you see I believe you have made a mistake in your article. It is not a part of Allah which was blown into each person but from a/the soul, which is a possesion of Allah. I think it is probably a point worth changing as it has already caused a bit of confusion and could quite possibly create some points to have serious Aqeedah problems.

    And Allah knows best.

    Jazakh Allah Khair.

    • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

      May 1, 2010 at 8:46 PM

      As-salamu alaykum Mr. Muslim. I am a believer in Tawheed and I reject “wahdat al-wujood” and the concept of achieving union with Allah. I am in fact a former student of Dr. Bilal and I got my grounding in tawheed from him. So it was not my intention to promote or imply a sufi or pantheistic ideology. I simply took the ayah at face value.

      I don’t believe that accepting the obvious meaning of the ayah necessarily implies such a conclusion.

      Nevertheless, I will remove that paragraph from the article in the future Insha’Allah, and will include the ba brief explanation from the classical tafseers, in order to avoid confusing debates over a point that is not central to the article.

      • Mr. Muslim

        May 2, 2010 at 7:55 AM

        Wa alaikum asalaam.

        I did not mean to suggest that you did imply such a thing, but rather that it could cause confusion and things and it was a bit inaccurate. I hope I haven’t caused any offence.

        Jazakh Allahu Khair.

        Wasalaam.

        • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

          May 2, 2010 at 2:45 PM

          No, not at all. I am happy for the feedback I have received here and I will adjust the article accordingly.

  14. Mr. Muslim

    May 1, 2010 at 5:00 PM

    And for the attention of Plamienka:

    I think you are looking for answers in the wrong place for your answers. Asking people on a message board is going to get you all kinds of answers from various people who may not be in a position to offer sound information. (I am not talking about anyone in particular, it just seems to me that asking for answers on a message board and then stating that things are not as simple as you once thought is not exactly fair.)

    I really cannot recommend Fundamentals of Tawhid by Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Phillips enough. It is a short and easy read and provides a clear and solid foundation in Aqeedah.

    Asking people who may

  15. Fozia

    May 1, 2010 at 10:41 PM

    The Prophet sallallahu `alayhi wa sallam used to make a number of supplications related to good character, one of them being:

    “O Allah, You perfectly created me, so perfect my character.”
    [Ahmad]

  16. Elma

    May 2, 2010 at 12:15 AM

    Salam,
    I support the message of this article as it’s a positive insight plus is very much within Islamic worldview. We really need more highlights as this nowadays to avoid the assymetric skew towards negativism that had creeped our discussions for ages now. Just two highlights:

    1. the ‘perfection’ attribute though in regards to our nature (physical, mental and spiritual), it does not hold true for our deeds…Allah wants us to live, struggle, repent, try and rejuvenate ourselfs in our way towards Him…as we live we learn and we grow…there is a room for lerning curve as long as we keep our niyyah pure and we lose no sight of the Eternal objective and we continuously repent…but, i belive the general mentality among us that we should be perfect in our daily behavior has contributed to a widened lethargy, passivity, proudness for our perfect ‘iman’, and finally rejection of our fellow muslims due to their mistakes along their way…which is all non-constructive and not islamic bcs we try to be something we are not by nature, angels….optimism was Prophet’s a.s way and pessimism was something that he warned against, however, claiming perfection at level of human action, might lead us to a pessimistic deadlock…

    2. the spirit blown into us: just few weeks ago, one of our dear old professors, had urged us to distinguish between the concept of spirit as Allah’s spirit and the concept of spirit as a property at Allah’s disposition…the first misleads us believe that we’got a part of God in us as inspiration to our very livelinesss….the second tell us what is rightly supposed to be, that Allah has bestowned an essence, a property, a decree that we be and be alive…it is in the name of the Creator that exists everything that there is in the universe, and a special essence has been put into human…not neccessarily a part of Creator to be blown into us, but it is His very Will, Wish and Decree to let us be, which would be sufficient…

  17. Ansar

    May 2, 2010 at 2:38 AM

    I find myself getting more and more disheartened whenever I read these types of articles. What noble ideas and how terrible that I have yet to find one person who truly believes this and implements it in their lives (myself included, unfortunately)….and, no, someone with a perfect appearance who says this but who, with one blemish, would turn their back on it doesn’t count….

    It’s truly sad that almost every sister I have met in my life does something inconvenient or painful to alter her appearance and it’s become so prevalent nowadays that not changing yourself in one way or another has become a sign of barbarianism in our communities. To the extent that, at times, putting on a facade of beauty has become a precursor to being a teenager.

    • sabirah

      May 2, 2010 at 4:20 AM

      salam
      personally i do believe it is Sheytan who makes us believe that we are never ok the way Allah created us, it doesn’t matter how old we are. Teenagers and kids want to imitate adults, as soon as we are adults, we want to look like teenagers….

      • Ansar

        May 2, 2010 at 10:06 PM

        “Teenagers and kids want to imitate adults, as soon as we are adults, we want to look like teenagers….”

        Agreed. I wonder, is this simply human nature? or a product of a corrupted society? In either case, how can we sit back and wonder why the next generation cares more about being outwardly beautiful rather than inwardly beautiful when we ourselves adhere to principles that emphasize the former over the latter. Just take the institution of marraige, where no one starts a conversation without having seen a picture first. We tend to spout off things like we are all perfect beings but who among us truly believes it? And if none of us really do, why do we even say it? Sorry, I’m not trying to start an argument here. I just see a bit of hypocrisy in here and feel that if we truly believe it, as we should, our priorities should be different.

    • Fozia

      May 2, 2010 at 4:38 AM

      There is some interesting feedback to this article, especially with discussions about the ‘Ruh’.

      Just want to remind my dear brothers and sisters, lets not lose sight of the beautiful message this article is aiming to give by becoming caught up with matters that really do not benefit us in any way. Knowing the fine details of where our ‘Ruh’ came from or whether the soul is eternal, will not make us a better or poorer Muslim.

      This article is uplifting and is an inspiring reminder that Allah(swt) created us with very great potential to ‘achieve’.

      Going against Allah(swt)’s Divine Law has created pollution and confusion on earth. But if we strive to re-acknowledge, re-appreciate and re-implement our ‘God given abilities – both mental and physical’, coupled with our ‘God given knowledge’ and ‘God given rights’; we can achieve inshaAllah.

      Beautiful article maashaAllah!!!

  18. sabirah

    May 2, 2010 at 4:09 AM

    salam

    jazhakallah, reading this article, I think it’s a nice boost for the confidence of the average looking self doubting human that has to struggle with the occasional pimple, or split ends hair or short and fat legs.
    But what if yourself or a member of your family is not created in this perfect manner, if it’s severely disfigured, disabled, needs constant help? How can we tell this person seriously that Allah swt has made it like that for a divine purpose and it’s perfect like that without feeling bad?

    • Wael - IslamicAnswers.com

      May 2, 2010 at 12:08 PM

      sabirah, this is a very good question and an important one. I’ll give you my take on it, and Allah knows best.

      Everyone is tested in different ways. Those who experience physical or mental handicaps are indeed undergoing a severe test.

      Still, everyone has an element of that perfection with which Allah created them. I didn’t mean to suggest that everyone has a perfect body, because that is obviously not the case. My right knee gives me problems and my lower back goes out on me every now and then. These are minor problems, but obviously not perfection.

      Instead I believe the ayaat in the Quran refer in general to our potential as human beings. Though not everyone can run like the wind, or do gymnastics like an Olympian, or ski down a mountain, or lift hundreds of pounds, when even one person does so it becomes an expression of that perfection that Allah has gifted us with. That’s why we love to watch the Olympics, because these accomplishments show us what is possible. They are a collective achievement for all humanity.

      As for the person who is disabled, he or she can seek to find and express his perfection in other ways. Look at Stephen Hawking, who has a disease that has left him almost completely paralyzed, but is a leader in theoretical physics. Look at Helen Keller, who suffered a childhood illness that left her fully deaf and blind (!) but still managed to become an author, anti-war activist, and campaigner for women’s rights and worker’s rights.

      As for someone who is mentally disabled, perhaps he has something to offer by bringing joy to those around him. Or more… The Special Olympics was created in recognition that mentally and physically challenged people can also achieve. Or, such a person may have talent as an artist or something else. One mentally retarded woman won an award as top state employee of the year in India.

      Everyone has something precious and valuable inside them. Everyone’s existence has meaning and purpose.

      • sabirah

        May 2, 2010 at 4:21 PM

        mashallah Wael, that was a nice answer.
        Just one more question, which I know is not really the topic here. There is hardly any literature or teaching available, but what happens with disabled children in the society, how are muslim families supposed to deal with it? How do they traditionally deal with it?
        All i found was in regards to disability due to negligence, for instance in case of disability due to an accident of a child, disease that came after birth or in adult hood which can be seen as test of Allah.

        • Wael - IslamicSunrays.com

          January 30, 2011 at 12:48 PM

          Sabirah, I only noticed your question now. Muslim families should love their children, disabled or not. They should not be ashamed, or hide the child away. They should accept that they were given such a child as a test from Allah and a unique blessing, and help the child to realize his full potential, however limited that may be. I know that our Muslim societies have a long way to go in this area.

    • Sayf

      May 2, 2010 at 1:07 PM

      Excellent answer by Wael, I’d like to add my input too.
      “Perfect” can be subjective depending on how a person views it, non-muslims may see physical defects as imperfect, but for Muslims its a different case. If a person believes that this life serves as a test, and that the most important measure is our deeds/actions/heart in relation to our potential/capability/intention, then who’s to say everyone isn’t perfectly created to suit that purpose in this life? This stretches to everything even a person with severe mental defects, they may be less on the deeds, but its relative to the potential the person was actually capable of.

      أَلَيۡسَ ٱللَّهُ بِأَحۡكَمِ ٱلۡحَـٰكِمِينَ
      Is not Allah the wisest of Judges? (95:8 )

  19. Plamienka

    May 2, 2010 at 5:41 AM

    “2. the spirit blown into us: just few weeks ago, one of our dear old professors, had urged us to distinguish between the concept of spirit as Allah’s spirit and the concept of spirit as a property at Allah’s disposition…the first misleads us believe that we’got a part of God in us as inspiration to our very livelinesss….the second tell us what is rightly supposed to be, that Allah has bestowned an essence, a property, a decree that we be and be alive…it is in the name of the Creator that exists everything that there is in the universe, and a special essence has been put into human…not neccessarily a part of Creator to be blown into us, but it is His very Will, Wish and Decree to let us be, which would be sufficient…”

    – he second tell us what is rightly supposed to be, that Allah has bestowned an essence, a property, a decree that we be and be alive…it is in the name of the Creator that exists everything that there is in the universe, and a special essence has been put into human…not neccessarily a part of Creator to be blown into us, but it is His very Will, Wish and Decree to let us be, which would be sufficient…”

    — it is in the name of the Creator that exists everything that there is in the universe, and a special essence has been put into human – so if the creator put some special essence into human being – and this essence has differnet source than Creator?

    – it is in the name of the Creator that exists everything that there is in the universe, and a special essence has been put into human…not neccessarily a part of Creator to be blown into us, but it is His very Will, Wish and Decree to let us be, which would be sufficient…”

    still it is a bit fishy. so you want to draw clear line between “Creator” and his “creation” in order to “guarantee” the “oneness” of the “Creator” – but the price is, that the “creation” is not clearly connected to the “creator” exactly through your very big effort to deny it.

    and another question – how can someone give that is not his own? How can “creator” give to “creation” something that is not his?

  20. Elma

    May 2, 2010 at 9:45 AM

    “so if the creator put some special essence into human being – and this essence has differnet source than Creator?” nothing, including the non-living things, has a different source but the Creator…

    “still it is a bit fishy. so you want to draw clear line between “Creator” and his “creation” in order to “guarantee” the “oneness” of the “Creator” – but the price is, that the “creation” is not clearly connected to the “creator” exactly through your very big effort to deny it.”

    there’s nothing fishy in here. In Islam there is a clear cut line between the absolute ontological presence of the Creator and the contingent ontology of the creatures…this clear cut line does not deny the connection between the two, the absolute centre (Creator) and the peripherical points (creatures), as the very existence of the latter ones nurtures on it’s inescapable attraction towards the Centre…this connection is the total dependance of the latter one on the Centre and it cannot be anything else besides this total dependence…

    “and another question – how can someone give that is not his own? How can “creator” give to “creation” something that is not his?”

    this is very simple. there is nothing that you could imagine, from this world of creatures (Dunya) or from the eternal world of other creatures (al-ghayb), that does not belong to the Creator. If it’s hard to imagine, then that is your limitation. Everything is a playfield for Him.
    in simpler ‘human’ terms, if someone is in need and starving close to me, i don’t have to cut my toe to feed him/her, instead, i can just offer a vegetable from my backyard garden,…moreover, these are cases of pure matter and are always too low to explain anything coming from the world of spirit….

  21. Sagacious Muslim

    May 8, 2010 at 1:05 AM

    JazakAllah for the article.

    In my opinion this is a good reminder to not give into worldly desires. It also brings up the invalidity of the current definition of perfection or beauty.

  22. Deany

    March 24, 2021 at 9:50 AM

    Beautifully written!!! I read it aloud as it’s so motivational for me to read in silent hahaha.. random comment, but this piece of article have given me a new perspective on ourselves as a human being. thank you for that :)

    • Wael Abdelgawad

      March 24, 2021 at 3:05 PM

      MashaAllah, I’m so glad to hear that. You are welcome.

  23. Irrelevant

    October 3, 2021 at 5:59 PM

    Its not relavent if humans were created perfectly or not. We are not here to be self-centred and thinking about how perfect we are, but how perfect Allah is. And its a nasty hearted person that calls others trolls, when they clearly are not. Get some understanding before you slander others.

  24. Irrelevant

    October 3, 2021 at 6:18 PM

    Here’s some rhetoric for the person who wrote this article… Would you like being called a troll!? That person you called a troll, to me was a humble person who could see the complexities of life, yet couldn’t understand it fully yet. What a beautiful person! Yet, others insult them because of their lack of understanding. What nasty people that slander others based on so little information of them! Worship Allah, not yourselves. Thats what Muslims are supposed to be doing.

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