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Reclaiming the Perceptions Of Muslims, pt. 3 — How Muslim Organizations Fail With Media

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Reclaiming the Perceptions of Muslims: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

In two previous posts, I’ve explored the topic of improving the relationship between Muslims and the media — from grassroots steps we can take as Muslims, then looking at how mainstream media (MSM) news operations function and some of the challenges they face in getting clear, usable information on Muslim issues.

In this segment, I’ll explore how Muslim institutions in particular have failed to meet these challenges.

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When looking for answers to the questions posed to our community — “Why aren’t Muslims speaking out?” or “Where is the moderate Muslim voice?” — the role of this media failure is a key facet to consider.

People, Not Quotes

To sum up from the last post: MSM outlets require a) a story that can connect with its audience; b) a wider range of easily accessible, less insular Muslim sources that are willing to speak in a compelling manner on Muslim issues or that can refer to those who are; c) a simplified understanding of the range of Islamic thought and discourse, and easier access to that diversity.

MSMs want a story,not just a reaction to an event — some kind of personalization, and ideally a localized one. “Official sound” is usually a necessary component, but by its very nature, it’s pretty much anathema if it’s all you’ve got. I’ve seen more than one story get postponed or cut from a planned 90 second or 2 minute segment to a 10 second anchor reader if other sources or elements don’t develop in time for deadline and all we have is official sound. There’s not a story there — it’s just a talking head.

You can’t make a story out of only official sound — and Muslims desperately need their own compelling stories to be shared, so that a tangible, personal shape begins to broaden and clarify the collective mosaic of Muslim identity.

It boils down pretty simply: newsrooms need stories, and Muslims need their stories told. How we can help connect those needs is what this series is about.

Of course, not every news story should be a Muslim story, but when there’s an appropriate event or a good fit, Muslim agencies should be prepared and proactive, be supple and agile enough to offer a compelling, useful, response.

Death by IIAROP

Contrast those needs of both the Muslim community and that of MSM outlets with the kind of statements released by major Muslim organizations after Ft. Hood, well compiled by Sheila Musaji in this post on her blog. I’ll repost some of her aggregation here, then analyze the releases from a newsroom perspective.

STATEMENTS ISSUED BY MUSLIM ORGANIZATIONS:

ISNA Islamic Society of North America: “The Islamic Society of North America condemns in the strongest terms the attack on soldiers at Fort Hood, resulting in the murder of at least a dozen soldiers and the wounding of many others. We express our deepest condolences to the victims and their families. Although many details of the shooting are unknown at this time, it appears that the attack was led by a career soldier, Major Nidal Malik Hasan. The soldier who led this attack was either mentally unstable, or was motivated by a perverted ideology for which there can be no justification. ISNA is proud of the many Muslim men and women who serve loyally in the United States military. We are grateful for the sacrifices made by all US soldiers, who represent the religious, racial and ethnic diversity of America, to defend the Constitution and our national security. ISNA, a faith endorser of US Muslim military chaplains, is proud of the service they provide, offering comfort and support to people of all faiths and beliefs. Just today, ISNA’s chaplain endorser, Dr. Louay Safi, conducted a workshop at the US army base in Fort Bliss, Texas.”

CAIR Council on American-Islamic Relations: “We condemn this cowardly attack in the strongest terms possible and ask that the perpetrators be punished to the full extent of the law. No religious or political ideology could ever justify or excuse such wanton and indiscriminate violence. The attack was particularly heinous in that it targeted the all-volunteer army that protects our nation. American Muslims stand with our fellow citizens in offering both prayers for the victims and sincere condolences to the families of those killed or injured.”

MPAC Muslim Public Affairs Council: “MPAC and the Muslim American community unequivocally condemn this heinous incident. We share the sentiment of our President, who called the Fort Hood attack “a horrific outburst of violence.” We are in contact with law enforcement and US federal government officials to gain more facts from this tragic incident and work together in dealing its aftermath. Our entire organization extends its heartfelt condolences to the families of those killed as well as to those wounded and their loved ones,” said Salam Al-Marayati, Executive Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council. We stand in solidarity with law enforcement and the US military to maintain the safety and security of all Americans.”

ADC The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee: “The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) is appalled by the attack that took place earlier today against soldiers and others at Fort Hood, Texas. Preliminary news reports have indicated that a rogue Army Major Malik Hasan and two others shot and killed at least 12 people and injured numerous others. ADC President Mary Rose Oakar said, “This attack is absolutely deplorable. ADC has been consistent and on record in condemning any attacks aimed at innocents, no matter who the victims or the perpetrators may be. Such violence is morally reprehensible and has nothing to do with any religion, race, ethnicity, or national origin. ADC urges the FBI and law enforcement agencies to make every effort to see that justice is served.” Oakar continued, “ADC also calls upon law enforcement agencies to provide immediate protection for all Mosques, community centers, schools, and any locations that may be identified or misidentified with being Arab, Muslim, South Asian or Sikh as a clear backlash has already started. The actions of a few should not invite a backlash on innocent members of any community and we urge law enforcement and others to keep that in mind. ”

AMAF/VAC The American Muslim Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Council: The American Muslim Armed Forces and Veteran Affairs Councail [sic], bold mine — msd(AMAF and VAC) condemns in the strongest terms the attack on soldiers at Fort Hood, Texas resulting in the murder of at least a dozen soldiers and the wounding of many others. We express our deepest condolences to the victims and their families. We join the Community of Fort Hood, Texas in their mourning. Islam holds the human soul in high esteem, and considers the attack against innocent human beings a grave sin. This is a criminal act that is now best dealt with by the law enforcement community.

The American Muslim Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Council (AMAF and VAC) is a not for profit, non-political, independent American based organization. AMAF and VAC was established to serve the spiritual needs and religious welfare of Muslims who serve or have served in the United States Armed Forces, their dependents, as well as veterans. This encompasses all branches of the US Military, including the US Coast Guard.

UMAA The Universal Muslim Association of America: “UMAA strongly and categorically condemns the heinous attack of a deranged individual in the name of Islam, at Ft.Hood Army Base. We pray for the families of the victims and the departed souls. No religion teaches any sort of violence against innocent civilians. The perpetrators of these vicious attacks have no semblance of being Muslims and do not belong to any civilized society. UMAA believes that the responsible individuals should be punished to the fullest extent of law.”

APAAM The Association of Patriotic Arab Americans in the Military: “At a time of deep sorrow in the midst of this horrific tragedy, our thoughts are first and foremost with the Fort Hood shooting victims and their families. One can only imagine the unspeakable pain and loss they are and will be dealing with in the weeks, months and years to come. It is unfortunate that whatever demons possessed Nidal Hasan, that he chose to deal with his problems in this way. In the aftermath of this terrible tragedy, it is more important than ever that we not make the same scapegoating and broad stroke mistakes that were evident in the aftermath of previous tragedies. The Association of Patriotic Arab Americans in Military urges the media, government officials and all of our fellow Americans to recognize that the actions of Hasan are those of a deranged gunman, and are in no way representative of the wider Arab American or American Muslim community. In fact, thousands of Arab Americans and American Muslims serve honorably everyday in all four branches of the U.S. military and in the National Guard. Additionally, many of us have willingly stepped forward to fulfill our duty with our fellow soldiers in both Afghanistan, Iraq and other locations around the globe for the defense of our national security, including most of the member of APAAM. Indeed, many of us are today currently deployed in both countries, honorably serving each and every day.

While these statements of unanimous condemnation by such organizations are certainly necessary, sincere, and often eloquent — and institutions of course can’t not release them — from a newsroom perspective, there is little memorable or useful in any of them. There is no story, no angle, no human connection; nothing offered that I can build a news piece around, only droning quotes to repeat. It’s all official sound, each interchangeable and in aggregate, somehow predictable, indistinct, generic.

It’s nowhere near enough.

These all fall under the category of what I call Death By IIAROP Release . For nine years, Islamic organizations have spewed out thousands of press releases saying “Islam Is A Religion Of Peace” (what I call “IIAROP” releases), and yet Islamophobia has never been higher. So you tell me if this is an effective and complete strategy with proven results. I think not.

Of the batch, the more enticing statements come from ISNA and APAAM. As a newsroom editor, I’ll want to know more from ISNA: Can Dr. Safi be reached for comment? Can he describe the workshop? How did he and workshop attendees react to the Ft. Hood news when it broke? How did he adjust or use the workshop itinerary, what kind of discussion ensued? That’s a great story. ISNA had the foresight to provide contact info for Safi, and announced plans for a later press conference.

APAAM is promising, too: strong, vivid, easy, unequivocal language, and also leaves me with a desire to know more. Tell me about Arabs and Muslims in the military, hook me up with someone who’s willing to talk about their experience. While the release is a little long and repetitive, their overall tone also imparts a sense of approachability: you clearly get a sense that if they were called, they’d be willing and eager to help share their stories and experiences.

CAIR gets some points for conciseness and strong language. Though they don’t offer me anything that makes me pick up the phone and follow up with them, their language and brevity makes them the most usable quote, and that’s of some value if I can find other material to build a piece around.

However, the usable accounts, the real stories — what a newsroom would truly need at that moment — did not come from any organizations, but from blogs. The moving stories of Muslims who have sacrificed in the American military, such as those concisely chronicled in the Beliefnet blog post “Crescents Among The Crosses” by Shahed Amanullah, were many, many links away from the prime sources of major Muslim institutions.

Robert Salaam, a military veteran and Muslim convert who keeps an active blog, also had great points, but was hard to discover initially.

As always, Sheila Musaji’s work at TAM provided great resources in addition to the above compendium, but again she demonstrated a reticent stance in engaging with non-Muslim media in some of her posts. If I were a non-Muslim in a newsroom, it’s clear she’s not going to be a source I can partner or ally with to help my viewers gain a better understanding of Muslims. Given their stance at the time, she and Assef were not going to help major media tell the Muslim story.

Organizations such as APAAM and AMAF/VAC should have had such stories of Muslim veterans readily on hand for the media to draw on, in addition to the largely interchangeable ‘official sound’ press releases. One shouldn’t have had to dig that hard to find such stories of Muslim American soldiers who have served this country — and newsrooms trying to find compelling ways to personalize or contextualize a breaking news event like Ft. Hood don’t have time to chase a 7-step chain of blog links to find such accounts.

Those stories were a strong collection of palpable, real experiences that could have connected and resonated with the mainstream media and its audiences had they been more easily surfaced. Instead, from a newsroom point of view, I’m pretty much relegated to deciding which bland, unmemorable, interchangeable “we condemn…” soundbite to use.

Disengaged

So if the major organizations couldn’t be bothered to offer a story, could they at least tell me what they’re doing, their plans, their next steps? Not really. Only ISNA announced a later press conference, and not very effectively, at that.

In events such as Ft. Hood that will impact the Muslim community, it’s important that Muslim organizations offer (or point to others who are offering) specific, future plans or courses of action.

In the case of ISNA, its announcement of the later press conference is cryptic as to the presser’s intent, other than to say “representatives from all three organizations will be holding a press conference … to discuss the matter further.”

This kind of nebulous ambiguity is not conducive to ensuring media coverage, because if a newsroom is juggling resources to cover events, clearly communicating what your presser will be about is essential, and can make the difference of whether your event gets covered or not. It’s not enough to tell a newsroom something’s happening: state specifically why it’s important. Be detailed, concrete, action-oriented in your press release headlines. Compare “Mayor Holds Press Conference To Discuss City Finances” vs. “Mayor To Unveil New Steps To Tackle City Budget”: The second sample is more specific, conveys a sense of more relevance to the user.

In researching this blog post, it wasn’t until I found ISNA’s post-conference release that I learned about the fund set up by ISNA for Muslims to donate for the victims. Considering that the announcement for the presser came earlier on the same day (“Today at 10 am”), it seems unlikely (but I suppose possible) that at least some basic plans for the fund drive hadn’t been arrived at in time to include in the announcement. If I know in advance the presser will touch on such a plan, I’m far more likely to cover it; that’s a tangible element and story, an interesting development. Without such specifics, three or four representatives simply “discussing the matter” has less appeal if I have a busy news day and limited staff to gather news.

None of the other organizations even hinted at future steps or plans, which is a particular shortcoming from the The American Muslim Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Council, in my view. Given the factors and questions that surrounded the immediate aftermath of Ft. Hood, it was the most qualified organization to take a very active stand in coordinating or relaying follow-up investigations and developments, offering military psychological experts, other Muslim soldier experiences, etc. So many questions were crying out to be answered, by Muslims and Non-Muslims alike, that AMAF/VAC could have provided a valuable service by taking an active and visible role in offering media access and availability. Instead, they offered a brief statement (with typo) and no visible follow up. True, their focus is not as a media relations arm, but even statements of what their courses of follow-up were would have been useful.

An in-depth analysis and critique of each of the above organizations’ web sites is beyond the scope of this post. In brief, however, all of the above organizations’ web sites could use varying degrees of revamping in terms of objective, targeting, focus, content, and ease of use.

More problematic was (and still is) the ineffective use of social media tools by all the above organizations.

While an effective leveraging of Facebook and Twitter varied among the organizations, most fell short (simply regurgitating or automating your web content onto Facebook is NOT a good practice).

However, the most egregious problem is that at the time of my initial analysis (Jan. 2010), NOT ONE of these organizations had their Twitter or Facebook information available anywhere on their main site — nor the ability to share its articles on social media. If you’re in the business of publicly disseminating information, that’s unacceptable. I only found their Facebook and Twitter pages via Google or Bing searches, or an internal Facebook search.

I’m pleased to report that some of the organizations have made some changes since then. Here’s how the above organizations stacked out at the time, along with an Oct. 2010 update:

  • ISNA: Facebook, Twitter, but neither available from main web site. Update: ISNA now has SM sharing features for its articles.
  • CAIR: Facebook, Twitter, but neither available from main web site. Update: CAIR now has SM sharing features for its articles.
  • MPAC: Facebook, but not available from main web site; no organizational Twitter that I can find, but its Director of Operations does have one. Update: MPAC now has SM sharing features for its articles as well as a nav for its Twitter and FB and other SM platforms.
  • ADC: Facebook, Twitter, but neither available from main web site. Update: Still no SM sharing features for its articles and no nav for its Twitter and FB.
  • AMAF/VAC: No Facebook or Twitter. Update: no change in status, though their site was redesigned.
  • UMAA: Facebook, Twitter, but neither available from main web site. Update: no change in status. Most links to internal pages now in fact not working.
  • APAAM: No Facebook or Twitter. Update: no change in status.

I did not make a search through YouTube to see if organizations had dedicated channels, though many have video on their main sites. No YouTube profile or channel was advertised from any of the main sites at the time, though MPAC now does have a link to its YouTube channel. YouTube has its own audience and viral buzz potential, and if organizations are putting up video, they need to be putting it there as well — and have that known somewhere on their site.

Newsrooms are increasingly using social media tools both to gather information and disseminate it. Muslim institutions need a far better understanding of how social media works and develop SM strategies for both their regular constituents and their media targets (the two are not the same and require separate, though complementary, SM approaches).

A firm grounding in strategic social media practices, along with more effective press releases and helping with accessibility to Muslim narratives, are key steps in allying with the media to improve the perception of Muslims.

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With nine years experience in mainstream news media -- first in radio, then web and social media for both print and television -- Mustafa Stefan Dill was an early advocate and practitioner for applying social media techniques to mainstream journalism. Dill has lectured on online journalism and social change at the Indian Institute of Journalism and New Media, Bangalore, India and has been featured in Online Journalism Review, The Media Center's Morph blog, J-New Voices, motherpie.typepad.com, and participated as a panelist in a national web seminar by the American Press Institute. In August 2010, Dill planned his escape from the newsroom environment launched a new consultancy offering PR, social media and new media strategies for a wide range of clients, with a specialty in serving Muslim and interfaith organizations and NGOs working in Muslim regions. Dill reverted to Islam in 2002.

17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. Tahmid

    November 2, 2010 at 12:59 PM

    Salam, I agree with you that muslims are not doing enough to change how the world views but you have to be living in a different world to believe that the western media really wants to view muslims in a positive light, Anything anti Islam will garner huge attention and viewers in the west and the few outlets that try to show the true picture of Islam are usually ignored by the vast majority of the masses.

    • BintKhalil

      November 2, 2010 at 2:40 PM

      Walaikum salam

      After all that analysis, that is all you have to say? That they don’t like us?

      The moral of the story, Tahmid, and I am phrasing it in words you will understand, is that our PR stance doesn’t make it any easier for them to like us.

      Articles like these are meant for Muslims who want to roll up their sleeves and get to work, and are seeking direction to do so, not for the Musilms who can keep chanting “oh, woe is us”.

      Jazak Allah khair brother Mustafa! Wonder if any of the people at the organizations mentioned will ever read this article.

  2. Mansoor Ansari

    November 3, 2010 at 9:10 AM

    ISNA: We are grateful for the sacrifices made by all US soldiers, who represent the religious, racial and ethnic diversity of America, to defend the Constitution and our national security.

    CAIR: The attack was particularly heinous in that it targeted the all-volunteer army that protects our nation.

    APAAM: Additionally, many of us have willingly stepped forward to fulfill our duty with our fellow soldiers in both Afghanistan, Iraq and other locations around the globe for the defense of our national security, including most of the member of APAAM. Indeed, many of us are today currently deployed in both countries, honorably serving each and every day.

    Even after these stmts ISNA & CAIR r labelled as a front for terrorist orgs. ISNA is grateful for the sacrifices these soldiers r making in Iraq & Afghanistan to ‘protect’ us at home & CAIR is advocating not only civilians even the US army cannot be attacked. AMAF/VAC considers soldier waging war as innocent human beings & UMAA considers these soldiers as innocent civilians. While APAAM is full heartedly supporting the wars in Afghanistan & Iraq. If even such statements doesn’t make them like us, what will?

    Even many anti-war non-Muslims Americans would not make such statements & yet r not hated as much as we are.

  3. fester225

    November 3, 2010 at 10:04 PM

    Mustafa,

    You’ve given us good examples of what not to write in a press release. How about an example of what should be written?

  4. Mustafa Stefan Dill

    November 4, 2010 at 1:05 AM

    Hi Fester :)

    I’ll draft up a sample in the next day or two and post it.!

    The main concept in the article is that the releases are vague and incomplete. They should have specificity re their plans and accessibility (“Our representative Dr. Abdul will be at x location and x time to discuss our program for offering support and counseling. He can be reached at 212.555.5555 for further inquiries”).

    I’m researching and seeking funding for the development of an internet model that can bridge the gap between media inquiries and Muslims who would want to answer such inquiries, because I think having readily available accounts on tap — such as Muslims in the case of Ft. Hood, in as mentioned in the post — would help meet that “human story” need for the media. Building out that accessibility needs to be done in advance, so it can be deployed right away; that’s what I’m looking into.

  5. HassanAdnan

    November 4, 2010 at 1:07 AM

    I think all of this calls a need for a Muslim Media Voice (Specially news media). The best you can score with the western media is to get your story half published (mostly missing the better half). In this case it is best to get your own voice and use your own outlet.
    P.S: Why do we use terms like moderate Islam, when there is just one Islam. Doing this we are getting trapped in the net of awkward ideologies as penned in Civil Democratic Islam.

    • Mustafa Stefan Dill

      November 4, 2010 at 2:10 AM

      I think all of this calls a need for a Muslim Media Voice (Specially news media). The best you can score with the western media is to get your story half published (mostly missing the better half). In this case it is best to get your own voice and use your own outlet.

      Salaams,
      I addressed this in a response to a comment on Part 2, but I’ll rephrase here:
      The problem with this, as I see it, is twofold. 1) Muslim media outlets tend to be consumed only by other Muslims; and 2) if you’re speaking of a massive news network launch, I’m not sure that would be a successful approach in America, which still wants its journalism to be “unbiased.” America is still uncomfortable with their news having an ideological filtration, as evidenced by the drummings doled out to Fox from the left or to NPR and PBS from the right.

      It’s my view that at this stage, working to build better relationships and a stronger presence with existing media outlets will yield more tangible, immediate results in terms of clarifying Muslim identity for the media over launching a Muslim major outlet, though I would support such an initiative if the time and conditions were right. Also see my response to Fester, above, re a ” bridge” model.

  6. Syrx

    November 5, 2010 at 4:42 PM

    Salam Alaykoum,

    Don’t you think that before speaking about muslim’s present into media, we should think about our presence in the worldwide economy? I am not talking about UAE only. I will develop if some are react to this intro.

  7. Hassan Adnan

    November 6, 2010 at 1:26 PM

    Assalam o Alikum Wr Wb,
    What are you suggesting brother? Are you suggesting Sunnah Money brother? If yes then I have explored the idea with few of my friends (who know how money works) and we have reached the conclusion that it is bit risky right now (Because it needs calrification, clean track records, great transparency) And Allah knows best. Do elaborate…

    • Mustafa Stefan Dill

      November 6, 2010 at 3:45 PM

      could be Sunnah money, but doesnt have to be; there’s some tech startup funding, possibly some media or journalism startup funding as well. Looking at it all, and fine tuning the biz plan.

  8. Syrx

    November 7, 2010 at 5:17 AM

    Salam alaykoum,

    Sorry to be late.
    First of all, I’m a french native speaker, so please be kind during reading.
    What I was introducing in my post above, is ” the fact that media – leaded by occidental nations – should have a reason to talk about us. Yes, actually, we need that others talk about us, because we are not able to speak about our self directly. We do not have the capacities however UAE does, they do not care about europ people. (talking for my part of the world). It’s like Judoka, just using the weight of the opponent due to our lightweight.

    So where could we be present? what spheres? For my part, – one more time – I think that we have to be present to spread our message and our utility, not just to “be present”. Lot of muslim are ingeneer, have a lot of intresting possiblity for the working system, like computering ICT, medecin, etc…

    We should be present by our working capacities. Finding solution, research, make discovers, etc.

    Using magazine, paper and web etc…

    We should cover the education, not just islamic education ,but science education + work, cause a lot of people have education (mastering, PhD, etc…) bu do not work. We have to create our own work world, with our mastering, to sell it in the worldwide.

    Next if you are intrested by talk about it.
    And sorry, I can not express my self more deeply due to my basic english.

    Take care!

    Salam alaykoum wa rahmatoullahi wa barakatouh

    • Mustafa Stefan Dill

      November 7, 2010 at 9:17 AM

      salaams,
      Je parle un peu Francais, mais c’est plus propre de parlez en Anglais ici…

      If I understand correctly, I do agree that we need to step up our economic and social contributions. As Dr. Assaf mentioned in a comment on part 2,

      The burden of first generation Muslims is the political baggage their brought with them from their motherlands. They argue that they are in America for one reason only: to make money so that when they return home, they will be able to afford to live a decent life. This nomadic and transient mentality does not encourage long term concerns about the well being of the society in which they live. Their lives are temporary, expedient and their loyalties are if not unfounded, are at best divided with their homelands.

      While that ‘s directed mainly at the situation in America , I imagine it’s a similar situation in Islamic European communities as well.

      If you’re in another country because of the opportunities it affords, then do your part and participate, contribute, give back.

      But such efforts need to be chronicled and documented as well, so thats why we need a stronger media effort.

  9. Syrx

    November 7, 2010 at 10:01 AM

    And how (with what) will you fill the media?

  10. Pingback: Reclaiming The Perceptions Of Muslims, pt. 4 – Analyse Your Press Release; Serving Non-Muslims | MuslimMatters.org

  11. Pingback: Reclaiming The Perceptions Of Muslims, pt. 2 — Understanding The Media | MuslimMatters.org

  12. Muslima M

    January 6, 2011 at 7:43 AM

    Mainstream media sometimes does cover Muslim topics:

    http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/3794/burqa-bombs-and-intolerance/

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