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Dawah and Interfaith

Winning Video “Dawah-ing” & Junaid Jamshed’s Anasheed

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This video was the winner of the Texas Dawah short-film competitions ($1000 prize-money) and was played on a giant screen in the Convention Center theater room. You knew everyone loved it because of the laughter and applause. Don’t miss the deeper message:

[youtube qaZ8c3E3NRQ]

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Hat-tip to Danish for the following inspirational video of Junaid Jamshed, singing a beautiful nasheed. People will recognize the chorus/first-two-lines are from Al-Busayri’s famous Qasidah:

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Most verses are in Urdu, but even if you don’t understand it, you’ll still enjoy it…

[youtube AHf8trOiD8o]

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Another Junaid Jamshed video based on Mufti Taqi Uthmani’s beautiful poem (in Urdu)… btw I used to love ‘Vital Signs’ in the ‘jahilliya days’ :) :

[youtube cdTcxBTBZ4M]

Keep supporting MuslimMatters for the sake of Allah

Alhamdulillah, we're at over 850 supporters. Help us get to 900 supporters this month. All it takes is a small gift from a reader like you to keep us going, for just $2 / month.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support MuslimMatters with a monthly donation of $2 per month. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

Abu Reem is one of the founders of MuslimMatters, Inc. His identity is shaped by his religion (Islam), place of birth (Pakistan), and nationality (American). By education, he is a ChemE, topped off with an MBA from Wharton. He has been involved with Texas Dawah, Clear Lake Islamic Center and MSA. His interests include politics, cricket, and media interactions. Career-wise, Abu Reem is in management in the oil & gas industry (but one who still appreciates the "green revolution").

8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Hassan

    April 4, 2007 at 7:42 PM

    Actually I just realized something (may be somebody already realized it, I am little late perhaps).

    Ok, basically I listened to Junaid Jamshaed version of Qasidah Burdah, which is not actually Qasidah Burdah at all, except for first two lines. And his lyrics seemed to be free of any exaggerations as far as I can say, as opposed to the original lyrics.

    Now it seems perhaps, that for one reason or another, the original Qasidah Burdah got a “musical tune” to it (I am not sure when, but it sure is catchy), and everyone who sings Qaseedah Burdah (original) more or less sings on same tune. So basically Junaid Jamshed used same tune, but put his lyrics in it.

    Now is it possible that vast majority of people specially in India Pakistan who love singing Qasidah Burdah (original one) is due to its tune rather than content (most don’t know arabic)?

  2. Hassan

    April 5, 2007 at 12:29 PM

    Here is the english translation of second video of Nasheed (3rd in total):

    Translated by Tahir Kayani

    O my Lord, I come to Your door as a beggar
    In complete indigence, bringing only my humility and shame.
    A beggar who has neither a joli nor a begging-bowl
    A beggar slain by his desires and cravings.

    Having squandered the treasure of Deen and intellect
    at the hands of the ego;
    Having sacrificed contentment of heart at the altar of lust and pleasure
    Losing my wealth in the quick-sand of heedlessness and sin
    I have come to seek refuge under the covering of your Kaaba.
    Through the stains of sin the heart’s world is suffering
    Aspirations are weak, the will broken and hope is dead.

    From whence should I find the strength to express the heart truly?
    For in this snare have I passed every moment of my life
    In short, having been burnt at the stake of my own ill-deeds
    In abject poverty due to the evil of my state

    To you have I brought my ill-stricken fate
    Empty-handed of any deed befitting your House.
    This House of yours, which is your court of Love and Grace O Lord
    Tis wholly Light and the repository of all Lights O Lord

    Being completely ignorant of the manners of your Doorstep
    A beggar knowing not how to beg
    My tongue fails to convey my heart’s feeling
    O Lord, have mercy on this wordless speech!

    These eyes are dry, O Lord, knowing not how to weep
    Festering spots in the heart that can’t be cleansed out.
    O my Lord I have come to your door as a beggar
    wholly indigent, in abject humility and full of shame.

    That’s Awesome, jak for finding this… now everyone else can enjoy the beautiful words of Mufti Taqi’s poem. -Amad

  3. Talal

    April 6, 2007 at 8:13 PM

    JazaakAllaah khair for the videos. I’d tend to agree about the “tune” of the burdah playing a large part in its widespread appeal.

    Does anyone know where to get Junaid Jamshed’s urdu-ized version in an audio format?

  4. AnonyMouse

    April 7, 2007 at 1:45 AM

    Hahahaha, I LOVE the “Dawah-ing” video!!! Hilarious!!! =D

  5. Amir

    April 7, 2007 at 8:30 AM

    On a related note, some brothers here in Australia have just recorded their first nasheed album. It’s not bad mash’Allah. See http://www.takbirproductions.com for a sample.

  6. ibn alHyderabadee (Danish)

    April 8, 2007 at 2:15 PM

    asSalaam ‘alaykum wa rahamtullah,

    I am pretty late at commenting here. Believe me I have been real busy, alhamdulillah! But I wanted to congratulate the brothers fro startign this great website. And my dua’ss are with you guys, insha’Allah!

    man I love the nasheed!

    i actually i looked through youtube for the burdah and surprisingly it is sung in different ways by different people – unfortunately a lot of them are accompanied by music.

    the most popular amongst them is definitely the manner in which junaid jamshed has doen it. this is doen by the group mesut kurtis and slightly different by habib Umar bin hafiz (habi ali jifri’s brother i believe)- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0gO-QOUleI

    But if you look at the way they do it in a group like the one by Hamza yusuf and Habib Ali alJifri it’s different – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LshInhQw43U

    there are different styles it is sung in – liek the andalusian style which can be found here – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8X56sLuTUt4

    and i found a few others which had more music than the poem itself and soem sung like pop songs and other sung by women.

    as far as the popularity goes, Allahu ‘Alam. i think it was popular because of it’s lyrics mroe than tune. It’s popularity in our time probably is due to the way it’s sung in the Indian Sub continent because most indians/pakis dont knwo arabic.

    Allahu ‘alam

  7. nbn_fan

    April 27, 2007 at 8:06 AM

    nbn is really cool mashalah!

    http://www.nobeatsnecessary.com

    also known as

    http://www.takbirproductions.com

  8. mohammad

    August 14, 2007 at 1:36 AM

    was wondering where i can get more translations of junaid jamshed naats. :)

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