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The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support us with a monthly donation of $10 per month, or even as little as $1. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

By: Khurram Dara
As American Muslims, we find ourselves in a tough situation. Islam has never been under more scrutiny. Our image is tainted and our efforts to change our image thus far have been ineffective. More importantly, time is running out. Continued acts of violence and terrorism perpetrated by Muslims and growing concern among Americans about the religion that seems to be at the forefront of it all, has spurred a national forum on whether Islam, as a religion, fosters intolerance, hate, and violence.

This is a strategy proposed by an American Muslim for American Muslims. It is a strategy that American Muslims should employ, if it is the case that we wish to combat negative stereotypes and perceptions about Islam. If you do not think this is important (even though it is), then this is not for you. But if you have genuine concern about the image of Islam in America and have the foresight to picture what life could be like for us if there is another terrorist attack against America, then this is your handbook. The Crescent Directive explains how we can revamp some of the negative perceptions of American Muslims. It’s the story of how PTA meetings, Thanksgiving dinner, and Little League baseball, with the help of Allah, can save the image of Islam in America.

It has several parts. First, we start with how the question about Islam has evolved over the last 10 years. After we narrow in on what the question is now, we discuss what our answers have been, and why they are not effective long-term solutions. Following that, we establish assumptions and outline the strategy of The Crescent Directive. The strategy will include a variety of specific, minor, and at times, seemingly facetious recommendations on changes we American Muslims can make in our everyday lives. The last section is an explanation of how these recommendations will change the image of Islam and closes with a few concerns and caveats.

To download the entire version of The Crescent Directive (for free), click here: you must have Kindle software. If you do not have a Kindle device you can download Kindle for Mac , Kindle for PC , or the Kindle app for your smartphone all free of charge for Muslimmatters readers til 3:00 a.m. EST  TONITE.

26 Comments

26 Comments

  1. Avatar

    BintKhalil

    December 28, 2011 at 6:29 PM

    Assalamu alaikum

    How to facilitate engagement of Muslims with their non-Muslim communities:

    Step 1: DO NOT require them to install a piece of software just to read an essay…

    • Avatar

      Khurram

      December 28, 2011 at 11:20 PM

      You don’t need to download software, sorry for the misunderstanding…you can read the essay in your browser, buy clicking the “read in kindle cloud reader” all you need to do is be logged in on Amazon.

    • Avatar

      Carlos

      December 30, 2011 at 1:40 AM

      That’s funny, BintKhalil. Thank you for the laugh. I never download anything from the internet either.

  2. Avatar

    chuck hird

    December 28, 2011 at 9:50 PM

    The Crescent Directive may just be the most important document of the 21st century if its purpose is accomplished. I only wish I could find a hard copy version as I don’t do Kindle or Kindle wanabees.

    • Avatar

      Khurram

      December 28, 2011 at 11:20 PM

      You don’t need a kindle or kindle-like device…you can read the essay in your browser, buy clicking the “read in kindle cloud reader” all you need to do is be logged in on Amazon.

  3. Avatar

    Mansoor Ansari

    December 28, 2011 at 10:47 PM

    After reading the book, I have to ask this. Did the scholars of Muslim Matters go thru the complete book & agree with all the suggestions or do they have reservations abt some of them?

    • Avatar

      Khurram

      December 29, 2011 at 1:06 AM

      This is in the cover page:

      *The views expressed in “The Crescent Directive” reflect the views of its authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of those at MuslimMatters.org. The views expressed on MuslimMatters.org do not necessarily reflect the views of those who authored “The Crescent Directive.”

      My understanding is that MuslimMatters is a forum for discussing various ideas in the greater Muslim community, both in America and globally, so promoting readers to consider this approach and the ensuing (hopefully) self-examination and internal dialogue that takes place among Muslims, is beneficial for everyone.

      • Avatar

        none

        December 29, 2011 at 2:30 AM

        Before we starting endorsing of bashing the directive let us hope that its a start. We need bold people to present bold ideas inshaAllah. Even if someone has ideas that are incorrect, inappropriate, if they aren’t revealed then we can’t discuss and improve upon the work of those who came before. But they have to be presented. I have not read the directive YET, but for people who are concerned about establishing their progeny in this land, we need to go through these growing pains and create opportunities to grow as a unit (whether it be an individual, family, community, Ummah). Browser issues should not prevent us from this undertaking inshaAllah. The writers’ of the directive could in fact be open to new ideas and discussions. If they are not, then inshaAllah someone comes up with an alternate directive (the Solar Flare Directive, the Full Moon Directive, the Starry Night Directive, the “Mother of All Directives” Directive, the “It doesn’t matter what your directive is” Directive etc) which improves the original piece inshaAllah. Perfection is only for Kalamullah and wahy, everything else is in need of improvement. Allahu alim.

      • Avatar

        Mansoor Ansari

        December 29, 2011 at 5:57 PM

        Jazak’Allah Khair,

        I first to commend on you the great initiative you have taken, I have two daughters who r toddlers & I worry abt what kind of America it will be for them by the time they grow up as it so drastically changed in the last 10 yrs. I do agree with most of ur suggestions but I don’t agree with some of them.

        The reason I had asked if scholars have approved of this is bcoz I see some suggestions which most of the general Muslim community & most of the scholars don’t approve of.

        One of this being the celebration of holidays like Thanksgiving, Halloween & New Years. While some scholars in America mite approve of Thanksgiving, from my observation of living in 3 different communities & in course of extensive travel due to my job I don’t see most of the Muslims approving of this esp the Imams. And when it comes to Halloween, I don’t see even the liberal Imams approving Halloween even though they approve of other holidays like Thanksgiving, Fathers & Mothers day etc. In you book you wrote that great many American Muslims already celebrate Halloween but my observation says the opposite. Were these observations based on the wide range of Muslim communities or a specific niche?

        Promotion of Music: Overwhelming of muslims regard Music as haraam even if they do listen to it. This is due to the fact that all 4 school of thoughts have that opinion & those that don’t follow a madhab also have the same opinion. In order to bridge gaps, we don’t & should not indulge in haraam & most importantly not promote it.

        The hot button issue: Terrorism
        It seems like the directive is over & over again blaming all issues on terrorism. Yes, terrorism is an issue & needs to be tackled. But we first need to start with defining it, there no agreed upon definition of terrorism. From my conversations with Muslims & non-Muslims… they both have different definitions of the word. I seriously think defining WHAT IS terrorism & WHAT IS NOT terrorism is very important & this has has to done before we start throwing this heavy word around.

        And to present it as if terrorism just came out of the blue & the west is free of any blame is presenting the issue in black & white when it’s not.

        I think to put so much emphasis on ‘terrorism’ & believing that eradication of it will stop them from hating Muslims is being naive. Looking at our history, we were hated even when there was no terrorism. Prophet Muhammed (saw) was preaching peacefully in Makkah & Muslim were hated and it continues to this day. My father comes from a country whr they were was no terrorism but Muslims were hated even then and yes they are r very much integrated & assimilated into the local culture that one can’t say tell the Muslim & non-muslim apart till the Muslim says he’s one. Bosnia is another prime example of how complete integration & assimilation was not able to save them. Hopefully, we don’t end like how Bosnian Muslims did or the situation of the Muslims of my dad’s country are in. I pray that my fears are just fears & don’t turn into reality.

        I hope you don’t take my criticism as an personal attack as they are not.

        Jazak’Allah Khair for your time.

      • Avatar

        Abdullah

        January 8, 2012 at 10:04 PM

        So how does putting up a disclaimer make something Haram, Halal to propagate through an Islamic website? I’m quite disappointed that MM would allow such views to be expressed through here. MM admins: Wa La Taawanu Alal Ithmi.

        Also, if you felt that it was that important for everyone to read, why do you have to put it up for sale only? If you want to sell it on Amazon, that’s fine. But a free version of it should be available as well.

  4. Avatar

    Tahmid

    December 29, 2011 at 2:30 AM

    http://www.halaltube.com/nouman-ali-khan-the-first-response-to-islamophobia-in-america

    Salam to the author of this article, May Allah(swt) bless you for your effort, I am having some difficulty reading it but will try to do so soon. This lecture by Brother nouman ali explains this well, If we muslims living in America want to improve our image just for the sake of being more liked in society and to avoid all the negative stereotypes then that’s the wrong intention to have as muslims. We should be projecting Islam in it’s true light for the sake of Allah and to show the people what Islam really is and if that’s our intention than InshaAllah we will be aided by Allah(swt).

  5. Avatar

    Abdurrahman

    December 29, 2011 at 7:01 AM

    Salamalaikum wa rahmatullah

    Having used the Amazon account to try to access the document; I was denied access to anything beyond the preface – in spite of attempting to read it using the Amazon browser.

    wassalam

  6. Avatar

    maryam

    December 29, 2011 at 9:09 AM

    The name ‘Crescent Directive’: why push the stereotype that indeed muslims believe in a moon god ? Muslims dont believe in a moon god rather believe God caused the moon to form.

    • Avatar

      Carlos

      December 30, 2011 at 1:38 AM

      Maryam, are you a proponent of the impact theory of lunar formation or the co-formation theory?

      • Avatar

        Maryam

        January 5, 2012 at 10:44 AM

        Well, I agree with mostly everything including evolution except the human evolution part that user potholer54 of youtube says. The point where cosmologists says we dont know, I assume the position of a theist.

        Potholer54 is an atheist, and I enjoy listening to his point of view.
        As far as I understand, you cant prove God, simply because he is in the unseen and outside of this physical world.

        As an atheist you may struggle with Islam a lot; as a muslim when I stepped out and tried to experience something non muslimish / something that an atheist would consider normal, the experience was yucky :) … but it made many things clear to me, why a muslim who understands Islam correctly chooses to live in Islam.

        I can understand your point of view very clearly but alas I really cant substantiate in any way to show you my point of way that is Islam and why it is correct. And I understand when choosing between Islam and atheism why you would choose the latter. :) …

  7. Avatar

    none

    December 29, 2011 at 2:46 PM

    Ok so now we have a problem. If we only had till 3am last night to read the directive, perhaps you (Khurram) should just make a pdf file available if this idea will be discussed. Otherwise people won’t be able to read your directive. Perhaps do a google books sort of thing where you release some of the document but not the whole thing if you plan on selling copies. You’d put a couple of pages from the first part, middle, and last part of the document.

    • Avatar

      Jeremiah

      December 29, 2011 at 3:59 PM

      The essay is only 0.99 cents.

  8. Avatar

    none

    December 29, 2011 at 5:38 PM

  9. Avatar

    none

    December 30, 2011 at 12:11 AM

    So in addition to our imams being trained on these dawah based points. We should also have our masjids employ some PR people or train youth in PR so we can begin the process of at least EXPLAINING our community’s islamic identity. Allahu alim

  10. Avatar

    Carlos

    December 30, 2011 at 1:44 AM

    Step 2: Don’t assume this is just a matter of PR, and that non-Muslim Americans are just a bunch of stupid, ignorant, decadent, bigoted rednecks.

    • Avatar

      A. Seymour K

      December 31, 2011 at 5:23 PM

      The above person is correct. ‘PR’ is not a ‘solution’ to ‘Islamophobia.’

      A great number of people dislike the truth and justice that is inherent in Islam, for various reasons worldly or spiritually. Hindus dislike Islam because it rebukes them, liberal atheists (such as Carlos) dislike Islam for all manner of reasons (I think the only thing less compatible with Islam than liberal atheism is Communism, probably)… and so forth.

      The only way to get people such as Carlos to like you is to give up Islam or make it so that it doesn’t inform you in your life, morality, or sense of self in any way, which is the exact same thing.

      It is not a matter of ‘PR,’ because no amount of PR will erase the fundamental beliefs of Islam which are what many people have an issue with.

      • Avatar

        Carlos

        January 2, 2012 at 2:18 PM

        Liking someone or not is something that goes-on on an interpersonal level. If you do not personally know someone, you cannot really “like” them. I like most people I know. Some people think I am naive in that sense. I have never personally met any of the Muslims who comment on this website, but, in so far as I do know them, I do like many of them, and many of their sentiments.

        Of the people I have met personally in my life, I like many who have starkly different philosophies than I do. There are not that many open atheists where I live, so, if I only liked other open atheists, I would like very few of the people I know.

        What is more important is that I love and respect all of my fellow humans, which I do. The only thing one needs to be loved and liked by someone like me is to be a human being, something for which we all qualify. I can see the good and the noble even in my worst enemies, the most awful haters and the most detestable criminals. When I think of someone I dislike, like a violent criminal I see on the news, I sometimes think of that person as an innocent child, and how much potential that child had to be a decent person. I think about the fact that the innocent child is still somewhere inside that person, and can still be reached, shown love, and made better.

        Muslim commentators of Muslim Matters, in so far as I know you, I like you. I have been very impressed by many of your comments, convictions and sentiments. I wish we could be closer. Even some who have said mean or stubborn things to me, I do not take it too personally, because I disagree with your negative opinions, including your negative opinions of me. More essentially, I love and respect you. I will never lose sight of your humanity and equality to me. You do not have to give-up your religion for me to continue liking and loving you.

  11. Avatar

    Ahsan (Cartoon Muslim)

    December 30, 2011 at 2:17 AM

    Insha’Allah I’ll be paying my $0.99 to read the directive. May Allah reward you, br. Khurram for initiating this.

  12. Avatar

    chuck hird

    January 1, 2012 at 9:43 PM

    I very much would like to read the entire Crescent irective but have been unable to do so. I have tried Amazon cloud reader and unable to read there. I would be willing to pay for a hard copy if available. Not willing to buy a Kindle because I still wish to read from a paper page.

  13. Avatar

    chuck hird

    January 8, 2012 at 9:54 PM

    I finally figured out how to get a copy of The Crescent Directive. Thank you all for your help. I now have downloaded the free Amazon Kindle Cloud Reader and paid the $0.99 for a copy. Now to get the time to read it.

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Complicated?:​ ​The A-Z of Women’s Modern Fiqh | Sh Waleed Basyouni

Sh. Waleed Basyouni

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Which deeds are most beloved to Allah?

Alhamdulillah, by the blessings of Allah (swt) and readers like yourself, MuslimMatters has been an independent platform for our best thought leaders to educate us in our faith and catalyze change through powerful, necessary conversations. Since our humble beginnings as a basic wordpress blog in 2007, our content has remained free.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support us with a monthly donation of $10 per month, or even as little as $1. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

You know that frustrating feeling of not knowing the answers to certain questions?

Questions like:

…am I praying or am I not?

…can I touch the Quran or can I not…?

…did that man really just say that because I’m a woman, I can’t do this, or wear that, or speak up?

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Women’s fiqh has a reputation for being complicated. However, the reason why is because nobody has given it the full attention it needs in the context of Muslim women living in the West today.

I propose we end that confusion, stop the misuse of Islamic texts, and reclaim the knowledge. This applies to the men, as well. Men will want to learn about this as well – not just because they have women in their life (a mom, a sister, a wife or a daughter). But because knowing the fiqh specific to half of the world’s population saves everyone from making dangerous mistakes.

The answers to your questions and the knowledge you’re looking for comes in a complete, online guided course:​ Complicated?:​ ​The A-Z of Women’s Modern Fiqh.

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Obituary of (Mawlana) Yusuf Sulayman Motala (1366/1946 – 1441/2019)

Monday, September 9, turned out to be a day of profound anguish and sorrow for many around the world. In the early morning hours, news of the death of Mawlana* Yusuf Sulayman Motala, fondly known as “Hazrat” (his eminence) to those who were acquainted with him, spread. He had passed away on Sunday at 8:20 pm EST in Toronto, after suffering a heart attack two weeks earlier.

Dr. Mufti Abdur Rahman ibn Yusuf Mangera

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Dar Al Uloom Bury, Yusuf Sulayman Motala
Which deeds are most beloved to Allah?

Alhamdulillah, by the blessings of Allah (swt) and readers like yourself, MuslimMatters has been an independent platform for our best thought leaders to educate us in our faith and catalyze change through powerful, necessary conversations. Since our humble beginnings as a basic wordpress blog in 2007, our content has remained free.

The Prophet (SAW) has taught us the best of deeds are those that done consistently, even if they are small. Click here to support us with a monthly donation of $10 per month, or even as little as $1. Set it and collect blessings from Allah (swt) for the khayr you're supporting without thinking about it.

A master of hadith and Qur’an. A sufi, spiritual guide and teacher to thousands. A pioneer in the establishment of a religious education system. His death reverberated through hearts and across oceans. We are all mourning the loss of a luminary who guided us through increasingly difficult times.

Monday, September 9, turned out to be a day of profound anguish and sorrow for many around the world. In the early morning hours, news of the death of Mawlana* Yusuf Sulayman Motala, fondly known as “Hazrat” (his eminence) to those who were acquainted with him, spread. He had passed away on Sunday at 8:20 pm EST in Toronto, after suffering a heart attack two weeks earlier. (May the Almighty envelope him in His mercy)

His journey in this world had begun more than 70 years ago in the small village of Nani Naroli in Gujarat, India, where he was born on November 25, 1946 (1 Muharram 1366) into a family known for their piety.

His early studies were largely completed at Jami’a Husayniyya, one of the early seminaries of Gujarat, after which he travelled to Mazahir Ulum, the second oldest seminary of the Indian Sub-Continent, in Saharanpur, India, to complete his ‘alimiyya studies. What drew him to this seminary was the presence of one of the most influential and well-known contemporary spiritual guides, Mawlana Muhammad Zakariyya Kandhlawi (d. 1402/1982), better known as “Hazrat Shaykh.” He had seen Mawlana Zakariyya only briefly at a train stop, but it was enough for him to understand the magnitude of his presence.

Mawlana Yusuf remained in Saharanpur for two years. Despite being younger than many of the other students of Shaykh Zakariya, the shaykh took a great liking to him. Shaykh Zakariya showered him with great attention and even deferred his retirement from teaching Sahih al-Bukhari so that Mawlana Yusuf could study it under his instruction. While in Saharanpur, Mawlana Yusuf also studied under a number of other great scholars, such as Mawlana Muhammad ‘Aqil (author of Al-Durr al-Mandud, an Urdu commentary of Sunan Abi Dawud and current head lecturer of Hadith at the same seminary), Shaykh Yunus Jownpuri (d. 1438/2017) the previous head lecturer of Hadith there), Mawlana As‘adullah Rampuri (d. 1399/1979) and Mufti Muzaffar Husayn (d. 1424/2003).

Upon completion of his studies, Mawlana Yusuf’s marriage was arranged to marry a young woman from the Limbada family that had migrated to the United Kingdom from Gujarat. In 1968, he relocated to the UK and accepted the position of imam at Masjid Zakariya, in Bolton. Although he longed to be in the company of his shaykh, he had explicit instructions to remain in the UK and focus his efforts on establishing a seminary for memorization of Qur’an and teaching of the ‘alimiyya program. The vision being set in motion was to train a generation of Muslims scholars that would educate and guide the growing Muslim community.

Establishing the first Muslim seminary, in the absence of any precedent, was a daunting task. The lack of support from the Muslim community, the lack of integration into the wider British community, and the lack of funds made it seem an impossible endeavour. And yet, Mawlana Yusuf never wavered in his commitment and diligently worked to make the dream of his teacher a reality. In 1973 he purchased the derelict Aitken Sanatorium in the village of Holcombe, near Bury, Lancashire. What had once been a hospice for people suffering from tuberculosis, would become one of the first fully-fledged higher-education Islamic institutes outside of the Indian-Subcontinent teaching the adapted-Nizami syllabus.

The years of struggle by Maulana Yusuf to fulfil this vision paid off handsomely. Today, after four decades, Darul Uloom Al Arabiyya Al Islamiyya, along with its several sister institutes, also founded by Mawlana Yusuf, such as the Jamiatul Imam Muhammad Zakariya seminary in Bradford for girls, have produced well over 2,000 British born (and other international students) male and female ‘alimiyya graduates – many of whom are working as scholars and serving communities across the UK, France, Belgium, Holland, Portugal, the US, Canada, Barbados, Trinidad, Panama, Saudi Arabia, India and New Zealand. Besides these graduates, a countless number of individuals have memorized the Qur’an at these institutes. Moreover, many of the graduates of the Darul Uloom and its sister institutes have set up their own institutes, such as Jamiatul Ilm Wal Huda in Blackburn, Islamic Dawah Academy in Leicester, Jami’ah al-Kawthar in Lancaster, UK, and Darul Uloom Palmela in Portugal, to just mention a few of the larger ones. Within his lifetime, Mawlana Yusuf saw first-hand the fruit of his labours – witnessing his grand students (graduates from his students’ institutes) providing religious instruction and services to communities around the world in their local languages. What started as a relationship of love between a student and teacher, manifested into the transmission of knowledge across continents. In some countries, such as the UK and Portugal, one would be hard-pressed to find a Muslim who had not directly or indirectly benefited from him.

Mawlana Yusuf was a man with deep insights into the needs of Western contemporary society, one that was very different from the one he had grown up and trained in. With a view to contributing to mainstream society, Mawlana Yusuf encouraged his graduates to enter into further education both in post-graduate Islamic courses and western academia, and to diversify their fields of learning through courses at mainstream UK universities. As a result, many ‘alimiyya graduates of his institutes are trained in law, mainstream medicine, natural medicine and homeopathy, mental health, child protection, finance, IT, education, chaplaincy, psychology, philosophy, pharmacy, physics, journalism, engineering, architecture, calligraphy, typography, graphic design, optometry, social services, public health, even British Sign Language. His students also include several who have completed PhDs and lecture at universities. His vision was to train British-born (or other) Muslim scholars who would be well versed in contemporary thought and discipline along with their advanced Islamic learning, equipping them to better contribute to society.

Despite his commitment to the establishment of a public good, the shaykh was an immensely private person and avoided seeking accolade or attention. For many decades he refused invitations to attend conferences or talks around the country, choosing to focus on his students and his family, teaching the academic syllabus and infusing the hearts of many aspirants with the love of Allah through regular gatherings of remembrance (dhikr) and spiritual retreats (i’tikaf) in the way of his shaykh’s Chishti Sufi order.

During my entire stay with him at Darul Uloom (1985–1997), I can say with honesty that I did not come across a single student who spoke ill of him. He commanded such awe and respect that people would find it difficult to speak with him casually. And yet, for those who had the opportunity to converse with him, knew that he was the most compassionate, humble, and loving individual.

He was full of affection for his students and colleagues and had immense concern for the Muslim Ummah, especially in the West. He possessed unparalleled forbearance and self-composure. When he taught or gave a talk, he spoke in a subdued and measured tone, as though he was weighing every word, knowing the import it carried. He would sit, barely moving and without shifting his posture. Even after a surgical procedure for piles, he sat gracefully teaching us Sahih al-Bukhari. Despite the obvious pain, he never made an unpleasant expression or winced from the pain.

Anyone who has listened to his talks or read his books can bear testimony to two things: his immense love for the Messenger of Allah ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) and his love for Shaykh Mawlana Muhammad Zakariya Kandhlawi (may Allah have mercy on him). It is probably hard to find a talk in which he did not speak of the two. His shaykh was no doubt his link to the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) in both his hadith and spiritual transmissions.

Over the last decade, he had retired from most of his teaching commitments (except Sahih al-Bukhari) and had reduced meeting with people other than his weekly dhikr gatherings. His time was spent with his family and young children and writing books. His written legacy comprises over 20 titles, mostly in Urdu but also a partial tafsir of the Qur’an in classical Arabic.

After the news of his heart attack on Sunday, August 25, and the subsequent effects to his brain, his well-wishers around the world completed hundreds of recitals of the Qur’an, several readings of the entire Sahih al-Bukhari, thousands of litanies and wirds of the formula of faith (kalima tayyiba), and gave charity in his name. However, Allah Most High willed otherwise and intended for him to depart this lowly abode to begin his journey to the next. He passed away two weeks later and reports state that approximately 4,000 people attended his funeral. Had his funeral been in the UK, the number of attendees would have multiplied several folds. But he had always shied away from large crowds and gatherings and maybe this was Allah Most High’s gift to him after his death. He was 75 (in Hijra years, and 72 in Gregorian) at the time of his death and leaves behind eight children and several grandchildren.

Mawlana Yusuf educated, inspired and nourished the minds and hearts of countless across the UK and beyond. May Allah Almighty bless him with the loftiest of abodes in the Gardens of Firdaws in the company of Allah’s beloved Messenger (Allah bless him and give him peace) and grant all his family, students, and cherishers around the world beautiful patience.

Dr Mufti Abdur-Rahman Mangera
Whitethread Institute, London
(A fortunate graduate of Darul Uloom Bury, 1996–97)

*a learned Muslim scholar especially in India often used as a form of address
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Top Read Muslimmatters Posts Of 2018

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Which deeds are most beloved to Allah?

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https://muslimmatters.org/2018/02/28/10-ways-to-overcome-porn-addiction/

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