My title encapsulates a critical message.  It frames Pakistan needing Imran Khan, not the other way round. Of course,  Imran needs Pakistan for his sense of identity and belonging, but he does not need Pakistan or its top job for personal enrichment or popularity. This itself sets Imran Khan apart from most other politicians. Imran has been blessed with more wealth and fame than most could ask for. On the other hand, nearly every other Pakistani leader has used government positions to plunder the nation's limited resources. You would have to dig deep to find a leader in Pakistan's checkered history whose sincerity can not be questioned, or who did not enrich him/herself while in government.

How is this is a “Muslim matter” or perhaps how this is relevant to the MM audience, most of which resides in the West?  I think both the questions are relatively easy to answer. Pakistan is one of the largest and one of the most troubled Muslim nations in the world, which has– unfortunately– become a hotbed of radicalism and “private” (not government sponsored) exporters of terrorism. Pakistan also receives extra attention from the USA, both in handouts and the murders of its citizens via drone attacks.  There is also a big diaspora of Pakistanis that reside in the West; that sees Imran Khan as its last hope for removing Pakistan from a dark abyss, that seems to be growing deeper by the day.

So here are the top reasons why Pakistan needs Imran Khan as its next Prime Minister:

1.     Imran is the only politician running for the top job whose honesty and truthfulness cannot be disputed. Pakistan's politics is especially dirty, yet the minions of other parties have not been able to find a single area in which Imran cheated others financially or acquired funds illegally. This in itself is quite marvelous. When one reaches Imran's level of influence, one can only imagine the countless opportunities he must have had to enrich himself beyond imagination.

But, he did not.

He has also kept all his assets in Pakistan and is one of the first to openly declare his assets.

2.     Imran has a track record of sincerity to Pakistan. It was only 20 years ago that Pakistan did not have a single cancer hospital, let alone a hospital that would treat all patients regardless of their financial condition; consider Shaukat Khanum Memorial Hospital. The only cancer hospital where the majority of funding its annual budget of $58 million is donations. A hospital that was not sponsored by any major organization or relief fund; that treated over 150,000 patients in 2012 including over 50,000 radiation treatments (source). Watch this documentary to enrich yourself. This hospital speaks more for Imran Khan than any other stump speech or campaign promise.

3.     Imran is not afraid to speak his mind; and does not shy away from taking the Western powers to task for the “war on terror”, referring for example to the “lies and deception connecting Saddam to Al-Qaeda”. See these two videos (excuse the corny background music in the first one): Video-1 and Video-2

4.     Imran has not made himself subservient to international powers. Global powers, including the West need Imran Khan, just as much as Pakistan needs him, as a partner for peace and prosperity. While it may appear beneficial in the short-term for the West to have another house-slave in the PM House (whether from Pakistan Muslim League or Pakistan People's Party), this will inevitably fail in the long-term when the party is not sincere to the people. These house-slaves can kiss up to the West and promise to do this or that, but unless they have a mandate from the people, the solutions will only be superficial and are bound to unravel. With Imran Khan, the powers to be will know that he will negotiate on an equal footing of integrity and mandate and will get the respect a leader deserve. Consider the example of China, tt bows to no one, yet a strong China has become the economic engine of the world–without which the West would have also suffered greatly.

5.     Pakistan has become a hotbed of radicalism and terrorism. It is obvious that whatever has been tried over the last 10 years is not working. In fact, the situation worsens by the day. A military solution cannot be imposed. Most Pakistani radicals–Pakistani Taliban or others– are not terribly concerned about attacking the West, but rather they are concerned about their own living conditions, their integrity and honor. When drones take out their entire families, that itself foments radicalism. As Imran has often said, terrorism is not a religion or a nationality or an ethnicity. It is an idea, and ideas need to be defeated in people's minds with words, not with bullets.

6.     It is Imran's turn now. All other major parties have had their shot. Nawaz Sharif (Imran's main rival from PML-N) is kicking and screaming about how he can fix everything if only he had one more chance. Let's personalize this, if you had a supposed friend who betrayed you five times (number of leadership opportunities Nawaz has had), each time making you worse off than the previous time, would you be ready to give him another chance?  Not only did Nawaz squander previous opportunities and large mandates to “fix Pakistan”, he actually joined hands with the last plunderer Zardari in a “unity government” that effectively destroyed Pakistan over the last 5 years.

7.     Imran has proven himself to be a “great” leader outside politics, and can become the prime minister that Pakistan needs.  Think about it. If you wanted someone to speak on your behalf on the great stages of the world, who would you want to be on your team?  There is something to be said about “great leaders” versus “good leaders”. Great leaders have a charisma that attracts good people; great leaders are the ones you can rely on, count on in difficult times, who you can trust. Imagine, as a Pakistani (or from the diaspora), Imran Khan addressing the United Nations assembly as Pakistan's leader— imagine the pride swelling up within you to hear an articulate, honest leader representing you. Would not it be amazing to have someone who does not embarrass you to be a Pakistani among non-Pakistanis?

                                                 

8.     Imran is a true role model for “moderate Muslims”. He does not shy from referring to Islamic principles and ideals. Even in 1992 before he entered politics, he wasn't shy of referring to Islamic ideals in an interview on 60 minutes. His response to whether he felt hopeless about Pakistan was that “hopelessness is a sin in Islam”.  Over and over again, on his campaign trails, in his stump speeches, he has referred to the seerah (Prophetic history) to take inspiration for himself, and to inspire others. He talked about the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him)'s suffering in Mecca and how the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) never gave up and kept the fight for justice. On the other hand, Imran Khan's party (PTI) includes all levels of Muslims and non-Muslims and piety and religiosity are not prerequisites to be in his party. This sets his party apart from Jamaat e Islami or Ikhwaan in Egypt. PTI is not an “Islamist party”. When the majority of Pakistanis do take inspiration from Islam, it is important that their leader represent that strain, and not be shy about referring to Islamic principles in leadership. This is no different from the American elections where candidates routinely refer to their religious background for inspiration and ideals.

I am sure many of those who are not enamored with Imran Khan may quip that most of what I have said is about Imran's personality and enigma, and nothing substantial about policies and politics. And they would be mostly right.

But you see when your starting point is between an honest man and a crooks and liars, we could talk day and night about whose policies would be better, but in the end great policies run by crooks and liars will invariably fail like a house of cards!

We are not talking about electing between Jinnah and Iqbal (Pakistan's illustrious independence leaders). Not even close. Imran's supporters are not oblivious to the fact that Imran Khan is a political novice, perhaps too much of an idealist, perhaps too honest for his good (if there is such a thing), but we have to consider the alternatives. We have to be realistic here.

If nothing else, Pakistanis can count on Imran Khan to work for them every day, to be on their side everyday, to represent them inside top-level meetings (with internal and external players) the same way as he said he would on the outside. If nothing else, he would make people like me, those who have adopted other nationalities and love other nations, to once again “feel Pakistan”; to once again feel that we could make financial investments in Pakistan, if only because we believe in Imran. There are many, many like me, who genuinely believe this.

I firmly believe that Imran Khan is Pakistan's last hope, and if Pakistanis don't jump on this opportunity that Allah has blessed them with, then they deserve whatever they get with the alternatives.

Pakistan needs Imran Khan.

To the people of Pakistan: Let Pakistan have Imran Khan.

Photo courtesy: Asianet Pakistan/Shutterstock

87 Responses

  1. Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

    If I was just voting for Imran Khan, I may be inclined to do so. But voting for PTI, we have to see all those around him as well. Unfortunately, the people around him do not represent to me the ideal leaders and decision makers I want in power. Do you think once Imran is in power he will be the final word on things? He doesn’t have the strong hand that someone like say Altaf Hussain does within the party to force people to toe one line. And we have seen that many have differed and splintered over time from PTI.

    I love the change he is talking about and we desperately need a break in the status quo. but I am just afraid that Imran is not the “Islamic” ideal (well actually no one in Pakistan is and hence my refusal to vote).

    -Aly
    *Comment above is posted in a personal capacity and may not reflect the official views of MuslimMatters or its staff*

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    • rabia

      imran is not the “islamic ideal”???…….if he isnt then i dont believe anyone in the World is…….he risks his life everyday to save the sorry lives of us so called muslims who keep beard n pray five times a day but donot have the guts or the faith in ALLAH to stand up against a tyrant gov for ourselves or our brothers…….n u say he isnt ideal……..if nothing else, atleast he is not an escapist…..atleast he is trying to help n not just sitting and waithing for that IDEAL ISLAMIC who will fall from the sky wearing a robe n sitting on a white horse!

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      • Hopeful

        Agreed. Much easy to criticize everyone than to go out and work in the heat. Imran might have shortcomings, but my utmost respect goes out to him for sacrificing a life of a celebrity for poor people. May Allah succeed him.

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      • O H

        Time will tell. There were many people jumping in joy when Morsi in Egypt got selected coz he seemed ‘Islamic’. I am not comparing them but let’s see what will happen. After so many dictators & puppet governments over the decades in Muslim lands it is hard to trust anyone until they prove themselves. Imran Khan is no different. He will have to work very hard to restore confidence. May Allaah place great leaders in all Muslim lands. Ameen

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      • ZX

        Prove himself? Please check his record. Building hospitals, Universities, All work done for the earthquake survivors… What does a man have to impress this new generation of internet warriors??

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      • Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

        Rabia, my point was that Amad wrote on his Islamic appeal in the post. SO that is not the case. As for IK’s passion and intent there is no doubt he is sincere and if he does win will bring improvements on the administrative level. However, in my opinion it is not going to be on the Islamic level. Wallahu Alam.

        -Aly
        *Comment above is posted in a personal capacity and may not reflect the official views of MuslimMatters or its staff*

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      • mominah

        Aly, don’t you think you are being a little too idealistic? Its a little naive to expect a true Islamic leader to arise at this point in the evolutionary process of Pakistan’s struggle as a nation. A nation cant just pop across the border from ignorance to perfect religious bliss in a singular move – its a process, perhaps one that spans decades. I believe that while Imran khan may not be the perfect leader in the light of Islam, he is most certainly paving the path to a better vantage point from where we, the people, can ourselves look around and assess our next moves towards a better nation and a better ummah. Please rethink your concept of ‘Islamic appeal’ – perhaps you think it is necessary to have a beard, to pointedly create resentment in detached Pakistanis with regards to all they do wrong in light of our religion, to make rigid, sweeping statements about Islam and Muslims and insist that all come around to your ideas without any co-operation on your behalf. While the time will come for better things, to get to that point we need to begin somewhere, heck anywhere, and that is what Imran is doing. Think of him as a stepping stone in a series of improvements that will eventually lead to a strong, proud Islamic nation. I don’t know if these improvements will take a century or a whole bunch of them, I just believe, from the bottom of my heart, that the ball is rolling, and come hell or high waters we’re gonna get there in the end. Imran’s Islamic appeal is bringing together a nation of Muslims and cutting down all divisions of cast, creed, class and culture. Imran’s appeal is making us shouting out the national anthem like little children again – we’re proud of Pakistan again. His appeal is reminding us that we bow before no one but God, we extend our hand before no one but God, his appeal is reminding us that as Muslims our leaders are infinitely accountable to us and to God. His appeal is that he saw evil and he spoke out with his tongue and he stopped it with his hand, and his appeal is that he made us care about our Muslim brothers and sisters once more. His appeal is that he tries. And I *believe* that this is good enough for God. I know to many Muslims this may not be enough, and I dont blame you – if history is any indication we are used to much better – but my heart says God wants us to hope again, so I’m going to let go of the colossal, suffocating fear and give this guy a chance. I know that this is going to sound corny/cheesy as hell, but maybe, possible vote for Imran Khan tomorrow? When you’re 80 and toothless and can no longer remember if IK won or lost, atleast you can say, “I voted because I believed God blessed me with hope”.

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      • Hyde

        “Better nation, better ummah”. Sister, you don’t see a contradiction in that ? That Pakistan was created as break-up of the ummah, and this absurd fervent nationalism is anti-ummah. An Islamic nation itself is an oxymoron, as is a secular muslim.

        Imran Khan is indeed the choice for Pakistan for now, but lets get the facts straight.

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      • Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

        Mominah

        It is not Imran Khan the person but PTI the party whose Islamic appeal I do not like. Nobody is a perfect muslim, and I don’t hold them to that standard (which I myself don’t fulfill). However, the basics (someone who prays 5 times a day, does not drink or do drugs, knows the basics of Tawheed, enjoins good and forbids evil) should be covered. A beard is the least of my else I have plenty of bearded folks who are a disgrace to Islam whom I could support.

        Personally I did isikharah because this is the procedure taught in Islam to make a decision and I made my decision not to vote.

        Your mileage may vary as they say.

        -Aly
        *Comment above is posted in a personal capacity and may not reflect the official views of MuslimMatters or its staff*

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    • Amad

      A vote for no one is a vote for status quo. With all due respect, that is a really sorry strategy.

      Yes, PTI is far from perfect, but think about the alternative. At least you can count on Imran on making a change, in trying to keep his party members straight.

      Really, I am surprised…

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      • Hassan

        Imam Malik was once asked whether it is better to have fasiq leader who knows running country in good way vs a righteous zahid but who does not have skills.

        He replied fasiq guy, because his fisq is only harming himself, while his good skills are helping ummah. While zahid’s zuhd is benefiting himself only.

        Imran Khan may not be very ideal in islamic way, but I agree Pakistan needs him to get on track.

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      • Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

        Agreed … but Imam Malik was not asked if you had the choice to bring him into power would you vote for him. Nor was there ever an issue of several leaders (that fasiq leader was still a Khalifa and not subject to “democracy”).

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      • Hasan Ashraf

        there is no problem with the democracy.
        the question put to Imam Malik had choice between as fasiq and a righteous.

        we just have more choices.

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      • Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

        Amad, I get your point on status quo but at the moment I think some people Imran has gathered around in positions of power are not my ideals to bring change. Yes PTI has brought much good to the political process by involving the youth and if they really bring the change they promise all the more power to them. I just have reservations of voting in general and even if I did it would not be for a party but for the candidate that was standing in my hood as he would be my rep in the parliament and any actions taken in parliament by him would be as a result of my vote. Thus, I would definitely want someone who atleast had a similar mindset as myself which I don’t see.

        I have several friends very involved in the PTI and they have my sincerest blessings in success to achieve their dream. I just think that dream is not very concrete and thought out. And we have seen IK’s indecision and flipflopping on several things (Taliban being one of them).

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  2. muslim

    asalaam alikeum,

    I am a Pakistani living abroad, an I have been told that devout middle class Muslims are being told by their Sheikhs/ Guides that voting for Imran Khan is un-Islamic. Their point being that Allah will question us about who we supported and Imran Khan in their view is a Secularist. They are being urged to vote for Jammat-i-Islami or Jammat-i-Ulema-Islaami parties.

    Is that a true inference? Will a person voting against these Muslim political parties be voting against the Shariah of Allah as these politicians vow to implement Shariah in all its might if they come to power.

    Growing up in Pakistan I found these sort of Islamic parties to be ineffective in their politics.. They lack any charisma. And they are know to be violent and promote violence in youth.

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    • Hopeful

      Wsalam. The fatwa you are talking about is issued by Maulana Fazlurahman, who is the guy known to deliberately have caused villages to drown in 2011 floods just to save his own banglow. Its nothing but a political fatwa. JI have themselves been involved in violence and have lost their legitimacy. In a country where anything can be sold in the name of Islam, JI has still failed to convince the masses to vote for them.

      Imran is certainly an honest and sincere at heart person. He tries to live by the sunnah and is not afraid to call a spade a spade. His services in philanthropy and education have already surpassed anyone else’s all without being in power ever. I request all those reading this to make sincere du’as to Allah for the success of Imran. May Allah make peace in Pakistan, and in the rest of the ummah. Ameen.

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      • Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

        > May Allah make peace in Pakistan, and in the rest of the ummah. Ameen.
        Aameen

        > The fatwa you are talking about is issued by Maulana Fazlurahman, who is the guy known to deliberately have caused villages to drown in 2011 floods just to save his own banglow.
        Hopeful, it is best to present evidence when stating such a big claim. Hearsay should not be the basis for such a statement (I personally have not seen any evidence of this).

        > Its nothing but a political fatwa.
        Agreed 100%

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  3. S

    To each their own. Just how weird is that MM is supporting IK officially….What if he turns out just like BHO did? Shame.

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    • Amad

      Please note that this article is the author’s sole opinion (mine), and does not represent MM in any capacity. This is obvious to most readers of MM that the authors can have different opinions and that MM does not officially endorse any political party (in America or elsewhere)

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      • Hyde

        Brother Sir Amad,

        Perhaps it is your imperative prerogative as the founder the MM to write about an issue involving the political status of country that you may have an affinity with. Your article, as the title suggests, is taking a political side which I disagree with as I am not thoroughly convinced of your arguments BUT I do agree with you with the overall idea of talking politics. Politics anywhere in the Muslim world are important and as there is No Separation of Church & State in our deen, thus we should be able to discuss everything (the recent vignettes on female sexuality were illuminating, although as a yet unmarried brother I do not think I should comment on those). Perhaps in the recent future (may be by me?) someone can write about the Ikwan in Egypt.

        Is Imran Khan the messiah of Pakistan? I hardly think so [even though his sanitized political autobiography was a good read], but as you stated for people who will vote, he may be the best choice. In fact the zeitgeist that Pakistan faces may well have the solution in Imran Khan. But for someone who has studied Pakistani politics intimately (but not academically) for some time now, I do not see Mr. Khan as an Islamic solution. Let’s not forget the man you referred to as illustrious [I certainly would not warrant that praise on anybody who helped in dividing Hindustan], i.e. M.A. Jinnah was good-clean secularist, and so are the elite of Pakistan and the elite of every so-called Muslim country. So I am not auspicious of Mr. Khan (except he will bring the Pathans the rightly due respect they deserve) but given the current circumstances am a wee-bit hopeful (although I would never vote for anybody…itself a vote).

        However it is concerning when one witnesses the large Pakistani community, some of whom have never probably seen an inside of a masjid, to go gaga over how wonderful Pakistan is and whatnot and that Imran Khan will a panacea for Pakistan. I know you may not believe in conspiratorial view of history, but perhaps him winning the election will be how the “wheels on the bus go around”. The next step is what God Wills.

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      • Addo

        Oh no, please. Nobody write on the Ikhwan cause if they get portrayed in the slightest positive view, I’m going to have to boycott this website, yes, I am that frustrated at them.

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      • Hyde

        Talking about those frustrations is what I meant…yes they have disappointed me too.

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      • Gibran

        Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

        What do you guys have against Ikhwan? Aren’t they trying to bring Sharia law?

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  4. alladin22sf@aol.com

    What do you mean by “What if he turns out just like BHO did? Shame”. US is much better off under Obama then it was under that lunatic Bush and InshAllah Imran will become the next prime minister and he will prove to be much better than these greedy folks like Sharifs and Zardaris.

    *This comment was edited by the MM Comments Team in order to comply with our Comments Policy*

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  5. N Iqbal

    Elections should not be about personalities but policies. Unfortunately Pakistani politics has been dominated by kufr political parties whose ideology is secularism. As Muslims we believe that nothing has been left out of the book and that Islam provides detailed solutions for every human problem. Imran Khan is the leader of a secular party which has introduced Islamic rhetoric in his bid to win the election and gain the ‘moderate’ Muslim vote. His approach is no different to the Islamic parties in Turkey, Tunisia and Egypt. The system in which these Islamic parties operate is undoubtedly non-Islamic and their participation is a sin for they mix Islam with kufr. The Prophet (SAW) rejected a position of leadership since sovereignty would not be for Allah (SWT) alone.

    These elections are therefore meaningless and the Ummah should be focussed on the removal of the kufr system and the re-establishment of the deen of Islam. Poll after poll shows that the public opinion in Pakistan and many other Muslim countries is ready for Islam. May Allah (SWT) grant the nusrah so that His (SWT) deen can once again be implemented.

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    • Amad

      Lets get back to the ground reality and see what is up for stakes “right now, right here”. Idealism will keep the status quo of crooks and liars in. For Islam to truly flourish, we have to first get the Muslims to behave 10% Islamically (from the current 1%).

      I leave it up to you whether you wish to vote or not, but this article is for those who have made the choice to vote and I would appreciate if you would respect that choice as I respect your choice not to.

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      • N Iqbal

        Islam was revealed to deal with reality. If the system is unislamic how is such a system removed and replaced with an Islamic system. Islam provides a solution for this reality. What you are saying is I am not interested in what Islam says and want to to change the reality using my own mind. Many scholars would call that shirk wouldn’t they?

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    • Hyde

      Good response. But then again we always seem to tiptoe on edge without getting to the gist of article. Pakistan by definition is a secular country in which Islam plays a role that “God only knows how”.
      A while back in the “Lawyers Movement”, you saw those people shouting about democracy and Thomas Jefferson and about the US Constitution… religion is the opium for the poor in that country and a former playboy who left “no club or skirt untouched” is hardly to going to change that.
      “I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
      Take a bow for the new revolution…
      Won’t get fooled again”.

      That being said, I do concur with brother Amad, that of the choices available at the current moment he may be the best of those that want to vote.

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      • muslim

        Your comment is utterly disrespectful towards a man who has reformed himself.

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      • Hyde

        We need revivalists not reformers.
        I am not saying I am sin free; I had my days in high school. But this “cult of personality” that impregnates Pakistani politics is really noxious.

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      • Gibran

        Assalamualaikum wa ramatullahi wa barakatuh

        Everyone who has committed a sin must conceal it lest Allah refuse to forgive him.

        I agree, it seems like a “cult of personality.” Doesn’t seem like Pakistans are used to being dazzled by a personality and then severely disappointed…I don’t think they know what’s coming.

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  6. azmathmoosa

    I’m an indian and i’ve hearing a lot of nonsense from the local media about pakistan. I’ve a few question if you don’t mind clarifying them:

    1. How serious is India as a threat to Pakistan? ; if at all.
    2. What difference does the PM of pak make? isn’t the military in actual power? (i heard they jst blackmail govt and judiciary)
    3. TTP referred to Imran khan as a “disgusting secular western man”, and were threatening to kill him, so is there a chance he will end up like benazir bhutto?
    4. How is the public opinion about secularism? I heard they have negative opinions abt it.

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    • Hyde

      1.) India (now America, Israel, NATO, and The West) has been the boogey-man for Pakistan since 1947. Anti-India is part of Pakistani foreign policy (Check out “strategic depth” in Afghanistan and the Plaid Avenger’s website on foreign policy).Does India actually pose a serious threat ?; probably not. India has left Pakistan behind in every endeavor except perhaps in poverty. However this must be stated and it is no conspiracy theory that The West would like to see a destabilized Pakistan, because it would serve their purpose to “get it in line” with the NWO.
      2.) The Pak Fauj is hands down is the de-facto controller (not ruler) of policies, especially foreign policies. Recently there has been a power hustle between the military establishment and civilian government, but generally speaking if you show too many balls against the army…well they’ll cut them off.
      3.) The alphabet soup politics in Pakistan is something, but Khan is not a “disgusting secular western man”, just “westernized”. Any public figure in Pakistan, religious or secular has a target on his back, and Khan is not going to be any different.
      4.) As somebody who is vehemently anti-secularist (my American right) there is not enough ink to rant on how damaging secularism (the new religion) has been on the Muslim world [read Brother Andrews’ entry on Imam Webb’s blog]. But Khan is the perfect politician. He is practicing Muslim, but a secularist Muslim i.e. he ain’t gonna do the sharia thing. Being a “secularist Muslim” [really an oxymoron] is ideal for the secularist nation of Pakistan. But other politicians have the same credential as well, but Mr. Khan seems to fit the role well.
      (The best up to date book on Pakistan is the well balanced book by Anatol Lieven. Pakistan: A Hard Country).

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      • ZAI

        Br. Hyde:
        Also read and recommend Ahmad Rashid’s trilogy on Afghanistan/Pakistan.
        Now there’s someone I wish would run for office in Pakistan. What a refreshing, sincere and honest voice amongst the Zaid Hamids and Hamid Guls. The man is a saint and someone Pakistanis should be proud to call one of their own! Heck, Im proud as a fellow human being.

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      • Hyde

        To call Zaid Hamid a saint is a disgrace to saints from all different religions..

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    • umar khan

      Basically you are an Internet user and you are saying these rubbish things about Pakistan!! If you want to really know about our country then do not believe on what these media people say!!! Basically IK (Imran Khan) will not work as a dummy PM as he will come in power to give something to Pakistan!! And yes it is true that we aren’t secular people we are Muslims and Islam (our religion) has set some boundaries for us and these boundaries really are necessary for people if you want to stop abusement which is really happening in India so you have to live in prescribed boundaries…. And Inshallah You will see that Pakistan will rise in the leadership of Imran Khan.

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      • Hyde

        Not apropos. It is an absurd claim to think Pakistan will ever be any sensible role to provide “Muslim” leadership. We have been hearing ” Inshallah Pakistan will rise in the leadership” for more than 65 years. But anyway, this is not the time or place to comment on the validity of Pakistan. I do hope IK wins and does something, but lets not play “pretty politics” brother. He ain’t the Great Leader or the Great Resurrecter. His [legitimate] personal piety and charisma will challenged by secular Pakistani politics..

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      • Gibran

        Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

        I am a bit confused as to why people are so enthusiastic over Imran Khan…..I think you all might be in for a sore disappointment.

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      • Hyde

        He does have credential that other candidates simply do not have. Weather he may be a disappointment, God only knows, but for the time being and given the circumstances, he may as well be the best choise Pakistan has

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  7. Amad

    1) in politics, it is almost irrelevant as everyone maintains the same anti-India position, although Imran has been to India several times in non-govt role
    2) Makes a lot of difference. No, military is not in actual power. They have a lot of influence, but politics is run by govt. And Imran will probably have the most balls to stand up to military.
    3) May Allah protect all politicians (PTI or others) from the scourge of terrorism.
    4) secularism and sharia mean different things to different people. Right now, it is all academic as all people want is food, shelter and electricity!

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  8. Rafiq

    I personally don’t think Imran Khan is best choice to lead Pakistan and the 8 reasons listed above to back him can be rebutted and countered by 50 opposing reasons. However, that is not what I want to write about. Regardless of who you support, Imran Khan or anyone else, the actual Pakistani electioneering system is floored. It will never allow anyone who can benefit the country to be elected. Having elections does not imply that you have democracy. The current electioneering system in Pakistan is just a cover for the corrupt to come into power and accumulate the nation’s wealth for themselves to buy properties abroad.

    Voters’ statistics; An OVERWHELMING MAJORITY always opted to Vote4None in Pakistan:
    http://passivevoices.wordpress.com/2013/03/30/voters-turnout-in-pakistan-a-sizeable-majority-always-opted-to-vote4none/

    Where did all the votes counted come from then?

    OVER 45% of the votes cast in the 2007 elections were proven to be FAKE:
    http://dailymailnews.com/0311/10/FrontPage/index.php?id=11

    Voter fraud: 65% of votes in Balochistan were BOGUS (!!!):
    http://tribune.com.pk/story/257762/voter-fraud-65-of-votes-in-balochistan-were-bogus/

    No wonder some of the residents there want independence. What can be expected from such an electioneering system? Nothing at all!

    Despite promises, only insignificant reforms have been made in the electioneering system, hence it is a complete joke and should be boycotted. By casting a vote, one is in fact giving further legitimacy to such floored elections.

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  9. ZAI

    Imran Khan supports the Afghan Taliban and therefore Pakistani military and ISI’s actions there…same as any Pak-government or military position for the past 20+ years. Indicates that Pakistani interference in Afghan affairs is to continue…

    So as an Afghan, to me it seems like no matter who wins in Pakistan…we lose.
    Therefore, could care less…

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    • Amad

      Even the USA and Afghanistan governments want to talk with Taliban now and Taliban are setting up official place in Qatar. What this “support” means depends on context. To be honest, most Pakistanis are concerned about Pakistan right now. However, my general statement that if you want a negotiating party, you want an honest one, still applies here. Imran would be good for all Pakistan’s neighbors.

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      • ZAI

        Br. Amad,
        You think the man who said this:

        http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/14/imran-khan-taliban-afghanistan-islam

        …is going to negotiate in good faith with the Afghan government?

        But fine. You know what, simply based on the respect I have for YOU having read your writing over the years…I will suspend belief and give Imran Khan the benefit of the doubt. Maybe the political climate and clout of the army/ISI is so strong he HAS to say this in order to get elected or stay alive, but once in office he will take the moral/ethical course. So I will hold my judgement for now…Proof is in the pudding, so I’ll wait for the pudding.

        Afghan elections are ALSO coming up though…so I hope that the Afghan people will see it in their interests to vote Amrullah Saleh, Hanif Atmar or Asadullah Khalid into the presidency. We’ll provide Imran with a good, patriotic Afghan negotiating partner because we Afghans also want to experience the pride swelling up within us to hear an articulate, honest leader representing us…I’m sure Imran will get along with any one of them better than Mushoo did and the Taliban will be ecstatic because they sincerely want to put that office in Qatar to use :)

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      • Amad

        Thank you for the respect. I hope I earn with IK’s good performance, if he gets a chance.

        I think it would be impossible to find any candidate who is perfect and has the “right” statement for every situation and for every person. I agree that this is an unfortunate statement but remember that he is fighting for a position in Pakistan, not for USA, not for Afghanistan. There is a very high distrust of Karzai that exceeds even of the Taliban… for most Pakistanis, he is worse of the two evils from what I observed.

        You can’t destroy a large organic movement with bullets, you have to win over the movement’s hearts and minds, which is why the Qatar office and USA/govt negotiations with Taliban. Otherwise there will be no peace in Afghanistan.

        I really don’t know how much IK can change the Afghan-Pakistan paradigm but I also do believe that the others will not do better! That is the key. At worst, it cannot get worse.

        Net-net, for Pakistan, for Pakistanis, Imran Khan represents change. Let’s remember the context here, as stated in my title.

        I also hope for similar positive change for Afghanistan, as the crap has hit the ceiling there with Karzai and his gang of warlords!

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    • Gibran

      Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh
      Why does Pakistan mess with Aghanistan? What benefit do they get from it?

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      • Hyde

        Oh brother…where does one begin…it all goes back to 1947…the Durand line, Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, the soviet aggression…in short Pakistan has always looked as Afghanistan as “strategic depth” a sort of lebensraum against India. A blog is not enough to express this “uncomfortable” relationship.

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  10. Addo

    From a 8 year old Egyptian’s point of view, as irrelevant as it is, this is a very superficial angle to look at Politics in the Middle East, in general. I’m not a ‘Conspirarory Theorist’, but everyone knows that there is no such thing as ‘Islamic Radicalism’, nor is it an actual reason, nor is it the actual motivation for the American involvement and tangling within the Area. NO COUNTRY will be allowed to prosper materialisticly under the hood of Islam because that will put an end to Capitalism just like it did to the Soviet Communism, and so, anyone whose election in line with America’s will and wish is bound to head with whatever he was elected for towards a crap fossa in the name of being an ‘Islamic Politician’ giving the green light to the anti-Islamization and ‘Liberalization’ of the Public Opinion and therefore the background of the next government.

    And please don’t be naive enough to say ‘but he’s not in line with Americia’s will’, because the last time that happened, and the Talibans got elected, they got demonised in the Media and the country got flipped over. And take Egypt as an example, Muslim Brotherhood convinced the Public they were all in for an Islamic Nation and did indeed win. But renewing the License of Nightclubs was the first thing they did, put a lot of Salafi activists in Jail, bonded in with Iran and Russia against the interest of Syrians, invited Shiite trends into the country, disgusted people in Islam pushing therefore for Athiesm, and ruined what an ‘Islamic Nation’ would have looked like in the minds of the ignorants.

    You have no Dog in this fight. It’s a lost battle, unless miraculously Pakistan as a whole start being better Muslims, knowledgeable and practical with their Religion.

    “..Allah will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves..” 13:11

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  11. Addo

    Sorry, not an 8 year old’s, but an 18 year old’s. My bad =/

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  12. Gibran

    Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

    Aren’t the best leaders those who hate the job the most until they are given a pledge? And aren’t the worst ones the ones who want it the most?

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    • O H

      To an extent. Not always though. E.g ln Surah Yusuf where Yusuf ‘alaihisalam asks to govern the warehouses of crops etc. Btw I am not comparing IK to the prophet but just mentioning the Fiqh of asking for position when there no better alternatives! Personally I am not a supporter of IK & I am not sure what to expect of him.

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  13. Sarah

    Imran Khan as a leader is great but his party, PTI, is far from perfect. Pakistani elections are very different from american elections– we do not directly elect the head of the state, we choose people who we trust to choose the right man for the job. This means that we need to vote for honest, sincere and God-fearing people who will represent our constituency and collectively select the best amongst them (btw, the statement “Imran is the only politician running for the top job whose honesty and truthfulness cannot be disputed.” is factually inaccurate) and there are better people contesting the elections than those in Imran’s team.
    So no, thank you for the advice but I will no be voting for PTI.

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    • Amad

      You are saying that the head of the state can be crook and liar and we will be just fine with a good representative. The real question is that if there are “good” representatives in the other parties, what kind of integrity allows them to stay in those parties. Have they no shame that they continue to be party to the corruption and plunder of the nation’s wealth?

      Priorities are set by leaders. I trust that with Imran in power, he will make the changes necessary to clean house, yes slowly but surely inshalah.

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      • Sarah

        No, please don’t infer what I never said or meant. There are around 180 political parties. Not all of them are corrupt and not all of them comprise of the ruling elite. I for one will be voting for Jamaat Islami, the cleanest, most organized political party in Pakistan. How you reached the conclusion that everyone else besides those in the PTI are shameless and corrupt is beyond me!
        No, priorities are set by the parliament. And in a truly democratic party, priorities are set by a committee or shuraa, not just by the chairman of the party.

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      • Amad

        I respect JI. I was fortunate to be in the company of Qazi Hussain a few months before he passed during a private gathering at a neighbor’s home in Lahore. He definitely appeared to be an upright and good man, rahimullah.

        But JI is not going to have a shot in the big picture. It is like the Libertarian party in USA, no real chance.

        I am more for inclusive parties, and Imran is someone who incorporates many aspects of an Islamic personality without running an Islamic party. I hope JI joins PTI at a later stage in some sort of partnership where there are mutual values (in parliamentary coalition for example).

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      • sam

        “Imran Khan might not be very vocal about Islam but when he stepped up on the stage, he first offered Sala’h. He is doing the same thing what we are doing without taking Islam’s name.” Syed Munawwar Hasan

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  14. raamishasadraza

    guys many of you are saying that imran khan is a good leader but his representatives are not good so u are not going to vote for pti. ok so what about the representatives of pmln and ppp. Are their representatives any better. At least imran khan is a good leader. He made shaukat khan hospital without being in power. So doesnt that tell u something>???? When he will be the leader of pakistan he will only work for the betterment of pakistan and he will straighten out the corruptions in his party. He will not sit idle. Actions speak louder than words. Imran khan is 1000 times better than nawaz sharif. Nawaz sharif just recently in his jalsa said that he would build a bullet train and other crap. His brother shahbaz sharif had recently said that he would get rid of all electricity problems. Did that happen? u can see that for yourself. SO guys i urge u please vote for imran khan so that pakistan can start prospering again. Dont vote for crap parties like pmln and ppp. Vote for PTI if u want pakistan to survive the next 5 years. May Allah bless pakistan in the next 5 years to come Ameen!

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  15. naeem

    I cannnot understand why even one Pakistani would vote for the corrupt musical chair alliance of Shariff and Zardari/Bhutto.
    Even the dumbest of all animals learn never to go back to a pond which has posion in it.

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    • DrawForceCurve

      “Even the dumbest of all animals learn never to go back to a pond which has poison in it.”

      I guess that shows our level of intelligence.

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  16. Muhammad

    ok we have tried PMLN, we have tried PPP and we have tried Moulana Fazlur Rehman. We have not tried PTI or Imran Khan so he merits a fair chance. He may have got some old faces in his party but i think majority of the faces are new- he has tried to appeal to the youth of Pakistan, he has held intra party elections and he is not involved in any kind of financial corruption. He is not strictly Islamic in the sense you guys are talking about but still he is more Islamic than other leaders that have been tried ( I measure their being Islamic or otherwise by their practical deeds, their deeds go against the teachings of Islam). Pakistan media has not been very supportive of this leader because someone who wants to break up status quo might also hurt their personal interests. (I am sure you saw a long list of journalists and media owners who were received secret funds from the govt.) And you know media plays an important role in shaping the opinion of the masses. So in my considered opinion instead of riding on a high horse we should come down and help this man win this election,

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    • N Iqbal

      Trial and error approach to ruling? Extremely foolish.

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      • sam

        Ok give us Pakistanis an approach that’s 100% guaranteed to work. We would be really thankful.

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  17. AJJ

    I have a simple question.
    PMLN and PPP took their turns couple of times, but before Musharaf (whom am I don’t like because what he did to pakistan), the media and teleco communication were never FREE (All we had was PTV and NTM), Cell phones were use to be a dream for any normal person.
    Both parties head left Pakistan when they were in trouble (which means they will again if something happens to Pakistan).
    For the first time in Pakistan HEC for standard education was developed and organized which eliminated all unrecognized and gali mohala universities. (Sorry to say but all these things were done by Military but at the end he escaped by giving us worst president Mr. Zardari)

    Please look at Japan, In world war II their infrastructure (Which includes roads, building etc) was completely destroyed but they worked on knowledge and building their nations mind which can’t be destroyed. Look at them now.

    The best part is Japans GDP growth is 5000% times more than all muslim nations on earth(All muslim nations with oil and other natural resources).

    Please google about your previous presidents and their crimes. Also one thing, please follow path of our be loving prophet P.B.U.H. before him every person including his closed companions (Khulfa rashdeen) were in dark ages, but he brought them to light.

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  18. Amad

    If anyone had doubt about Imran Khan, then this hospital bed interview and his oozing sincerity should put those to bed! Vote PTI!

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    • Gibran

      Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

      Don’t set yourself up for disappointment

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      • sam

        It’s just that IK doesn’t have a record of disappointing. So far he has done all the stuff he claimed he would do.

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  19. O H

    By the way did any notable scholars or shuyookh comment on this Pakistani election & who should the Pakistani Muslims vote for? Would love to hear their discussion in this. I am talking about those scholars or shuyookh who seem to be independent of any political party. Sincere scholars, not those influenced by other people, would be able to enlighten us more on this key issue as they are well grounded with Islamic knowledge & hikmah/wisdom. I am sort of tired with shaykh google & mufti wiki on forums! Not saying that discussion is a bad thing, mind.

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    • Aly Balagamwala | DiscoMaulvi

      One of my friends consulted his Shaykh in Karachi (who is relatively apolitical) on whom to vote for if none of the candidates are upto standard from an Islamic viewpoint. He was told to vote for the lesser of the evils WHICH HAS A CHANCE TO GET ELECTED.

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  20. Mohammad Haque

    -Deleted comment as all disgusting and vulgar personal attacks on Imran Khan. Really PTI detractors should be ashamed of how low they have to go to discredit Imran Khan. Nothing about policy but same bakwas about Jewish lobby, Jemima, Sita, and so on. Get over it! -Amad

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    • Gibran

      Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

      Brother, don’t believe everything you hear, especially if the information comes from a fasiq. In Pakistan, I’m not sure how you tell who is a fasiq or not. You know better.

      What on earth is wrong with marrying a person who is an illegitimate child? Look, I think people may be setting themselves up for disappointment here, however there isn’t any need to go all out. Also, to the best of our knowledge he is a Muslim so if you expose his faults, expect Allah aza wa jal to expose yours.

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  21. Abu Balkan

    Amad I think you have a hard time getting over your belief that somehow a politician that is not going to introduce/rule the law of Allah is going to save Pakistan from the current situation.
    This is a matter of aqeedah and I strongly recommend you and those who side with you to study this field in more debt. An earlier post mentioned the example of imam Malik; however you fail to visualize that the example of a fasiq ruler doesn’t = not rule by shariah.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXeZPN6uJG4

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  22. Rabiya

    Really great read and insight. Pakistan truly needs Imran Khan and it is really heartbreaking that Pakistani elections are rigged. But to look on the brighter side, Imran Khan did bring change in the way things are done in Pakistan and he will continue to. Pakistanis voted like in no other election and the youth was involved (which is a GIANT plus). InshaAllah things will slowly turn around for Pakistan. For those living in Pakistan and did NOT vote in this election(I saw some commenters mention), you should show yourself out of the country. Living in the west, I don’t vote in the American elections because I honestly don’t think Obama or Romney or anyone else could do anything for me personally here. They are pretty much the same people to me. However, if I were in Pakistan and intentionally did not vote during this election, when my country needed me the most, I would not think too highly of myself. If you are living in the mother country, might as well be part of it. THERE IS SO MUCH IMRAN KHAN HAS DONE AND WILL CONTINUE TO DO FOR PAKISTAN, that all Pakistanis can benefit personally from. Some of us can only dream of being a part of Pakistani history in the making.

    All other arguments aside, IMRAN KHAN should have been prime minister cause he brought home the world cup in 92. He gave Pakistanis a sense of national unity and national pride that we can STILL BRAG ABOUT IT TO THIS DAY.

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    • Gibran

      Assalamualaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh

      I don’t think this national pride is worth anything on yawm alQiyamah. Pretty worthless and it only seems to have bad effects. Now you should have national humility if an anything.

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      • Rabiya

        Walikumasalaam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

        You sir are obviously not a cricket fan lol. Now that you bring up yawm al qiyamah, I realize I sounded like an idiot when I said Pakistanis should vote for him because he won the world cup for us, that should not be the reason why they should’ve voted for him, the author has mentioned plenty. Pride may have not been the right word but I do think our nation should be a unified one and cricket always happens to unify us, even in the west. It makes us love our country more and for me, whenever the cricket season comes around, I feel like I love my country more than ever and that I should really do something about the problems and issues it’s going through because those are my brothers and sisters suffering, I hope that’s worth something on the Day of Judgment.

        I really can’t comprehend why anyone would not vote for him, he has done for the country what none of us, Pakistanis, have even attempted.

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  23. shab

    Man, we get a leader we deserve. Pakistanis do not deserve a sincere n honest leader like imran khan rather they deserved n got same old liar n thief who looted national treasure with four hands(b4 he only had his brother, but now multiply 4 with 10 this time as his daughter n two nephews n sons are part of govt as well)…

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  24. ahsan arshad

    I am surprised by the results-a great upset for me. PML N has won a clear majority although some seats are being alleged to be rigged.
    Pakistan needed a change from a clean leader. The country deserved better.
    On ARY news abrar ul haq supposedly provided proofs of rigging the election of his seat- which seemed to convince me. He stated in anger that ahsan iqbal is a “bohat bara ghundaa” (gangster). Rigging was expected-i dont know what will happen with such a country-multi faceted problems too much for Pakistan.

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  25. sohail

    Great article. All the reasons are very strong but unfortunately, Pakistani politics is run my mafias. it is not easy to break this status-co because all the stake holders are in strong bound pf plundering and protecting each other. the mass movement is not possible because most of the rural population is in the clutches of the feudal lords and literacy and awareness even in cities are not that much high which could enable the people to realize the gravity of the situation to stand up with imran to dismantle this power structure. it would take long time to win over these mafias of power and their unholy evil alliance.

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  26. fais

    policies can change, crooks and liars will most likely not.

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  27. Talal Khalid

    Praise be to Allah: On the basis of the very basic level of Knowledge of the Book of Allah and the Sunnah of His blessed Messenger (may peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) does not represent the Islamic Ideal. To keep ”husn e zan” we can think that may be no one has explained true Islamic ideals to him or he doesnt want to put his party in a negative spot in the secular democratic system by ascribing to the true Islamic Ideals, however a subjective review of what he is presenting will clearly show that his brand is a distorted mix of secularism, socialism, some of his own thoughts, and some aspects of Islam. This hotch potch is a darkness and certainly not the light with which Allah sent His blessed Messenger Muhammad (may peace and blessings of Allah be upon him). May Allah guide us all to the pure Islamic Ideals.

    Talal Khalid
    Lahore University of Management Sciences

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  28. awaiskhan

    So desperate Pakistani Nation from our politician they need some brave n honset leaders.they see Imran khan as hope of nation but so many challenges Pti have been faces…

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