Statements from MM authors & Shayookh:

Yasir Qadhi statement (separate post <– click)

Yahya Ibrahim (tweets/statement):

Tweet: Surprised by some Muslims praising Osama bin Ladin? The ideology espoused by him is not the Sunnah or Truth. Allah protect us and balance us.

Statement:

BISMILLAH

Islam is a faith built on pillars that call to connecting to the Creator, the Al- Mighty Allah. It is built on experiencing the pangs of hunger that many feel while we lavish in what they would perceive as unfettered luxury. Islam is established firmly in altruism and sharing the bounty provided by the Most Gracious Maker.  The pilgrimage reminds us of our humanity and equality and that the mark of distinction is piety.

The spirit of Islam is identified in the personality and bequeathed modality of Muhammed sala allahu alihi wasSalam. The sunnah has always be the middle path. The beacon of moderation and universal morality. Islam is immortal and no fear for it should be acknowledged. Fear for us, its adherents, however, is another matter.

With the killing of Osama bin Ladin comes a great challenge for the Islamic community. His life is between him and His Judge, the Most Aware and Wise.

The Islam we know is under siege from within. The weapon is a blunted instrument of deviant  ideology calling to rebellion, anarchy, hatred of all that is not “us,” and a disdain for anything that is “American” or ” Western.” It is a call that is simplistic and bewilderingly callous – kill them, because they killed us.

That is not the way of Muhammed sala Allahu 'alihi wasSallam and it will never represent the Ummah.

That ideology sadly survives the death of many. Its Janazah will only be performed when the pen will be mightier than the sword. Intellectual combat must become the weapon of choice and fear must be overcome.

Youssef Chouhoud (tweets):

If I had to guess, I'd say that Osama's death is going to be met on the streets of Egypt with indifference far more than indignation.

The reality is that OBL was a perceived super-villain in the West far more than he was a perceived super-hero in the East.

In truth, he wasnt that super in either direction. OBL ceased to matter in a real way long ago – his death, as his latter life, is symbolic

That said, I'm sure the victims of 9/11 are feeling a very REAL sense of relief, joy and, perhaps, closure from Osama's death.

To those affected by 9/11 OBL's death is meaningful in every way. Here's hoping, too, that his death brings some peace to the AfPak region.

Amad (tweeting for MM):

OBL's legacy: directly responsible for killing of many innocents, and indirectly an excuse for the killing of many-fold more.

“If anyone killed 1 person unjustly…it would be as if he killed entire humanity” (Al-Qur'an 5:32) Osama leaves behind evil legacy

With Osama's death, we hope that USA starts focusing on what inspires & breeds terrorists. For starters, Israel's brutal occupation

If plan is 2 give Osama an Islamic funeral, “burial at sea” appears impermissible. Sh. Ash-Sharabasi, Professor at Al-Azhar (LINK: Islamonline cache)

Hena Zuberi (tweets):

Wonder how Osama is answering munkir and nakir right about now?

Aly Balagamwala (tweets / Thoughts):

Pakistan needs to brace for backlash of BinLaden death. :(

“The United States is not, and never will be, at war with Islam” – President Obama « Actions speak louder than words Bin Laden

THOUGHTS:

As a Pakistani, the news of Osama Bin Laden's death brought a mixture of emotions:

Relief – Well that's one less “problem” to worry about.

Skepticism – Yeah right, he was in Abbottabad! Just how in the whole world was he a stone's throw from the Military training academy in Kakul and no one knew about it?

Dismay – The claim that he was in Pakistan all these years was true!

Fear – May Allah protect us (the citizens of Pakistan) from the backlash that is surely going to stem from this.

Cynicism – So what if he's dead? There are many more such monsters out there that will continue to haunt us.

Anger – Why is the Pakistani government / military not issuing any statements about an event in which they obviously participated.

Mistrust – Was Osama Bin Laden really alive all these years? Or was he part of some grand conspiracy? Why did they do a sea burial without showing the body to anyone?

Sadness – A misguided individual died without being able to see the light.

Iesa Galloway (Statement)

I feel both hopeful and somewhat liberated by the news of Osama bin Laden's demise.

Hopeful because justice always finds those who mass-murder innocent men, women and children.

Osama bin Laden was a symbol of terrorism. His death marks a pivotal moment, a moment in which Islam and Muslims can be liberated from association with the cancerous ideology that he and other hate-filled liars falsely preach in the name of a faith and a people who reject their toxic call.

As Muslims, we must remain vigilant against all forms of terrorism. We also must reach out to our neighbors, our fellow countrymen and invite them to stand against fear and suspicion. Only people of goodwill acting together can create a safer, brighter future based on mutual respect and freedom.

As always, our actions or lack thereof will define us.

Tariq Nisar Ahmed (Facebook)

They can only kill anybody once. Real justice will be when a person answers to Allah for what he did and did not do. That Day there will be no injustice to anyone and no respite from repeated and endless torture in hell except for those upon whom is Allah's Mercy. So be the person to turn to Allah in repentance for the deeds no one else knows of but Him.


Other Islamic Organizations speak up:

  • Islamic Society of North America Welcomes Justice For 9/11 Victims (ISNA Press-Release)
  • CAIR Welcomes Elimination of Osama bin Laden (CAIR-LA Press-Release)
  • Federation of Muslim Organizations UK -FMO (Press Release-PDF)
  • Islamic Circle of North America (ICNA Press-Release)
  • Muslim Council of Britain- MCB (MCB Press-Release)
  • Muslim American Society- MAS Press Release
  • The leaders of Washington-area Muslim groups say Osama bin Laden's death has left their community feeling a sense of relief.  Speaking at a news conference, Monday, the director of the Washington office of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, Haris Tarin, said he hoped Bin Laden's death would begin a new chapter in the United States' relationship with Muslim countries.  The president of the Islamic Society of North America, imam Mohamed Magid, said he, too, was feeling hopeful and relieved that an icon of terrorism is gone. Press Conference video

 


See Also:

  • Al-Jazeera live blog
  • In response to bin Laden death, Vatican says Christians 'do not rejoice' over a death (Reuters)
  • Bin Laden's Death: Triumph or Tumult Ahead? (Alternet)
  • Detailed write up of the meetings/planning/ strategy that went into the killing of Bin Laden (Huffington Post)

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